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Gifts from the Kitchen

  • Recipe

    Three-Herb Olive Oil

    Bottle the oil in a clear bottle with a cap seal or cork top. For a stunning gift, put together a vinaigrette starter kit, including a bottle each of herb oil and Sour Cherry Vinegar, and a jar of fancy sea salt. It's an especially nice combination over pale endive leaves.

  • Recipe

    Sour Cherry Vinegar

    This fruity, sweet-tart vinegar uses dried sour cherries, so it's just as easy to make in December as in July, and there's no need to pull out the cherry pitter. Package it in a tall, clear, skinny bottle to show off its garnet hue. Include a gift card with a suggestion to make a vinaigrette by whisking this aromatic vinegar with a nut oil, such as hazelnut or walnut.

  • Recipe

    Homemade Aquavit

    Flavored vodkas may be all the rage with the chocolate martini set, but aquavit—a traditional, spice-infused spirit from Scandinavia—is a far more sophisticated tipple with notes of fennel, caraway, and coriander. Although aquavit keeps well at room temperature, it’s traditionally served chilled.

  • Recipe

    Spiced Mixed Nuts

     

  • Recipe

    Spicy Maple Walnuts

    These nuts continue to toast a bit from the intense heat of the glaze, so don't overbake them. Leave the ginger slices in the nut mixture for a delicious surprise. Pecans or hazelnuts are also great this way.

  • Recipe

    Toasted Spiced Cashews

    This recipe uses garam masala, a fragrant mix of toasted, ground spices that in India varies from cook to cook. It seems that there are infinite variations, many of which contain cinnamon, cumin, cloves, nutmeg, mace, coriander, cardamom, and black pepper. You can make your own, buy it in the spice section of well-stocked supermarkets, or order it online from Adriana's Caravan.

  • Recipe

    Mrs. Lenkh's Cheese Sablés

    These crackers are great with drinks and go especially well with dry and off-dry sparkling wines. The dough keeps for two days in the fridge, and for months in the freezer (thaw it in the fridge before using).

  • Recipe

    Rosemary-Parmesan Coins

     

  • Recipe

    Scallion Mustard

     

  • Recipe

    Brandied Mustard

    Lightly sweet from the honey mustard and heady from orange zest and brandy, this unusual condiment is elegant enough to adorn your holiday table (if you don't give it all away, that is). It goes perfectly with any kind of roasted meat, fowl, or game.

  • Recipe

    Pear-Ginger Chutney

    Brighter and less sweet than your average jarred chutney, this fresh-tasting, lightly spiced pear and ginger version is dotted with mustard seeds and dried cranberries.

  • Recipe

    Green Olive & Almond Tapenade

    The saltiness of your olives will determine how many anchovies you use. For best results, make the recipe in the following amount, making additional batches if you want larger quantities. It will keep for a few weeks in the refrigerator.

  • Recipe

    Pumpkin Spice Bread

     

  • Recipe

    Cranberry & Almond Bundt Cakes

    You could bake a pie or batch after batch of cookies to bring to a party, or you could delight the host with an elegant, festive bundt cake dusted with confectioners' sugar. This cake is made to last; it'll hold up for as long as a week and you can bake it up to a month ahead of time and freeze it. Your host doesn't have to know how easy it was to make.

  • Recipe

    Chocolate Chip-Banana Bread

    Banana bread, delicious on its own, is made better (and even more kid-friendly) with the addition of chocolate chips.

  • Recipe

    Chocolate Stout Cake

    Rich, dark, and toasty stout beer plus deeply flavored molasses give the chocolate flavor of this cake some wonderful nuance. With this recipe, you can bake one big beautiful cake, perfect for entertaining, or a dozen irresistible miniature bundt cakes, perfect for gift giving.

  • Recipe

    Classic Cream Scones

    These plump, moist scones are rich and subtly sweet.

  • Recipe

    Cranberry, Orange & Walnut Streusel Bread

  • Recipe

    Triple-Orange Pecan Biscotti

    These twice-baked Italian cookies smell divine and are delicious eaten by themselves or dunked into hot tea or coffee. 

  • Recipe

    Orange-Poppyseed Pound Cake

     

  • Recipe

    Peppermint Brownies

    These brownies only get better after a couple of days, as their texture gets fudgier and their flavor richer. In testing, we used Bigelow peppermint tea, but any herbal peppermint tea will work. Peppermint extract is available in grocery stores or by mail order.

  • Recipe

    Vanilla-Tangerine Caramels

     

  • Recipe

    Chocolate-Hazelnut Truffles

    These truffles use a hazelnut-chocolate blend called gianduia. To give my gianduia more complexity, I like to use a mix of dark and milk chocolates, but you can make the recipe using just one type of chocolate if that's what you have on hand.

  • Recipe

    Caramel Popcorn

    At Craft restaurant in Manhattan, where I work as the pastry chef, I like to send out a small bowl of caramel popcorn as a parting gift to guests. I prefer yellow popcorn; it seems to yield the biggest popped kernels.

  • Recipe

    Bourbon Balls

    For some of us, it wouldn’t be Christmas without these rich, potent treats. I like to make them with chocolate or vanilla cake scraps that I’ve saved in the freezer, but you can also use a store-bought pound cake, since saving scraps takes some forethought. But if you happen to have scraps, or even a leftover cake layer, here’s your chance to use them.

  • Recipe

    Marshmallows

    These will keep in an airtight container for about two weeks.

  • Recipe

    Traditional Peanut Brittle

    The relatively large proportion of corn syrup in this recipe prevents the sugar syrup from crystallizing. There's no need to wash down the sides of the pan or take any other precautions against crystallization as you do with other candymaking.

  • Recipe

    Toffee-Chocolate Candy

  • Recipe

    Boston Cream Candy

    Don't be tempted to use anything smaller than a 3-qt. pot for this delicious caramel fudge-like candy. You'll need the volume when the hot, sugary liquid foams up during cooking.

  • Recipe

    Simple Chocolate Truffles

    Why give your valentine store-bought chocolates when it’s so easy to make your own gorgeous truffles? When coating these truffles, it’s important to work quickly and in batches so the chocolate doesn’t harden before you roll them in their tasty coatings. We prefer to use Dutch-processed cocoa powder to coat the truffles because it’s brighter in color and less acidic than natural cocoa powder. But if you can find only natural cocoa, you can use it instead. Make it Your Own: Use the Chocolate Truffle Recipe Maker to create a one-of-a-kind recipe. Choose from milk, semisweet, and white chocolate. Then select your flavorings and coatings. You can save, print, and share your recipe with a friend or sweetheart.

  • Recipe

    Hot Fudge Sauce

    Splurge on really good chocolate for this recipe, as the flavor will really shine through.

  • Recipe

    Caramel Sauce

    Sugar can burn easily, so use a heavy-­based pot, preferably one that doesn’t have a dark interior so that you can monitor the sugar once it begins to color.

  • Recipe

    Bittersweet Chocolate Rum Sauce

    This simple yet divine chocolate sauce may be made with bittersweet or semisweet chocolate. Taste the sauce on ice cream before adding more sugar; chocolate sauce that tastes too strong on its own is usually perfect with ice cream.

  • Recipe

    Chai Mix

     

  • Recipe

    Garam Masala

    Garam masala, which means hot spice, is the Indian equivalent of the French herbes de Provence or the Chinese five spice powder. The recipe changes from region to region in northern India, with each household adding its own touch. As a rule, garam masala is added at the last step of cooking, almost like a fresh herb. If cooked too long, it tends to become bitter. Garam masala is available on some grocery store spice racks as well as in Indian markets, but for the best flavor, toast and grind your own.

  • Recipe

    Moroccan-Style Spice Rub

    Give your vegetables a Moroccan kick by tossing them with this warm spice mix before roasting. It pairs especially well with sweeter or starchy vegetables such as butternut squash, carrots, cauliflower, parsnips, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and turnips.

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Season 4 Extras

Season 4 Bonus Episode: New York City

Moveable Feast did not go to New York this season, but we couldn't skip the Big Apple completely! In this web-only episode, chef Francis Derby and cookbook author Aliya LeeKong…

View all Moveable Feast recipes and video extras

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