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Video Series: Test Kitchen Tips

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    How to Boil an Egg

    Learn the difference between soft, medium, and hard-cooked eggs and two different methods for making perfect hard-cooked eggs without overcooking them.
     

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    How to Cook Rice

    Cooking a basic pot of rice seems like it should be simple, but even great cooks can find it frustrating. You get rice that comes out too hard, rice that comes out too mushy, or a crust of scorched rice at the bottom of the pot. In this video, our Test Kitchen expert shows you how to avoid all those pitfalls and cook the perfect pot of rice every time.

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    How to Roast a Beef Tenderloin

    Learn how to make a perfectly roasted beef tenderloin for your next special occasion or holiday meal

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    How to Make Lemon Curd

    Creamy lemon curd is a versatile topping or filling for many desserts. And though it’s very simple to make, it is prone to curdling or scrambling. In this video, you’ll learn a method for making lemon curd that’s guaranteed to turn out silky and smooth without straining.

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    How to Make Caramel

    Making your own caramel is a simple process. But there are a few pitfalls to watch for. In this video, you’ll learn how to make a basic caramel that stays liquid and is perfectly cooked. You’ll also learn how to turn the caramel into an easy, creamy sauce.

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    How to Roast a Chicken Perfectly

    Great roast chicken is the measure of any home cook. You want crisp, flavorful skin and moist, juicy meat. You want to fully cook the thighs without overcooking the breast meat. In this episode, I'll share our recipe for the ultimate roast chicken, with all the tips you'll need for delicious results every time.

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    How to Roast Eggplant

    One of the easiest ways to cook eggplant is to simply roast it in the oven—it uses a lot less oil than frying, but you still end up with the same tender, sweet flesh and silky texture. In this video, you'll learn a mostly hands-off way to roast eggplant so it's not at all oily or bitter.  The first step is to salt the eggplant to draw out some of the moisture. Eggplant has a tendency to suck up oil like a sponge when you cook it, and this helps reduce its ability to absorb the oil.  Cut the eggplant in half and score the flesh pretty deeply with the tip of your knife in a cross-hatch pattern. Don't cut all the way through to the skin, but do cut fairly close to it. And you can keep the cuts pretty large.  Press on the edges of the halves to open the cuts and sprinkle kosher salt over the surface and into the cuts. Let the eggplant sit cut side up for about 30 minutes while the salt draws out the water. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 400 degrees._______________________________________________________________________Looking for more ways to cook eggplant? Read How to Cook Eggplant to Tender, Silky Perfection for recipes and tips on roasting, grilling, and frying eggplant._______________________________________________________________________ You won't necessarily see a lot of water on the surface after a half an hour, so you'll want to gently squeeze the eggplant out over the sink or a bowl. That will remove quite a bit of water from the eggplant. Pat the eggplant dry with paper towels. After you've patted the eggplant dry, brush the cut sides generously with olive oil. Set the eggplant on a parchment lined baking sheet—again, cut side down—on top of one or two sprigs of thyme. This gently flavors the eggplant as it roasts. Put the sheet in a 400 degree oven and wait. It takes about an hour for the eggplant to fully roast. The eggplant will collapse and the flesh on the bottom will turn a dark brown, caramelly color. After roasting, let the eggplants cool for at least 20 minutes before handling. Simply roasted eggplant is perfect for making Baba Ghanouj or other dips, or you can just drizzle it with a little vinaigrette and serve it as is for a delicious side dish.  Want more ideas for roasted eggplant? Check out all our roasted eggplant recipes.

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    How to Cut Orange Segments

    Test Kitchen contributor Nicki Sizemore shows how to use a thin, sharp knife to cut the tender fruit segments of a grapefruit and an orange away from their tough membranes.

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    How to Slice, Dice or Chop an Onion

    Learn how to cut an onion into uniformly-shaped pieces so it cooks evenly

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    How to Trim Artichokes

    Whether you're braising, sautéing, or steaming them, cooking artichokes means  taming their thorny personality: you've got these sharp outer leaves, and the prickly choke inside. In this video, you'll learn how to cut down artichokes to their hearts or bottoms, and how to trim them when you're steaming them whole. Before you do anything with artichokes, you want to have a bowl of lemon water at hand. The cut surfaces of artichokes tend to brown as soon as they're exposed to air; dropping them into the water as you work will slow down this browning. Squeeze three lemon halves into thebowl of water--no need to pick out the seeds. Hold on to the fourth lemon half to rub directly on the cut surfaces of the artichokes.  To trim artichokes down to the heart, start by snapping off the dark-green outer leaves until you reach the cone of paler, more tender inner leaves. At this point they're really more yellow than green.  Cut off the top third of the artichoke and all but 1 inch of the stem.  Now use a paring knife to  peel away the tough outer layer of the stem and remove the base of the leaves all around. Cut the artichoke in half lengthwise. With a spoon or melon baller, scoop out and discard the hairy choke and thorny inner leaves.  If your recipe calls for quartered hearts, just cut them lengthwise, and you're good to go. These go into the bowl of lemon water, and I use a clean wet dishtowel on top to keep them submerged as I work.  Sometimes a recipe calls for a whole artichoke bottom. This is similar to the heart, but just involves trimming off more of the leaves and stem so it sits flat on the plate. Pull off the outer leaves again, down to the pale inner cone. But now we cut the leaves much closer to the base, and cut off the entire stem.  I use my paring knife to trim away the tough green skin on the underside, and then my melon baler to scoop out the prickly choke and thorny inner leaves. The simplest way to prep an artichoke is if you're steaming it whole. All you do is trim off the stem, leaving about a 1/2 inch. Then pull off any tough small leaves near the bottom.  Remove the thorny leaf tips by cutting about 1/2 inch from the top. Use kitchen scissors to trim the tops from all the leaves that are a little lower down.  And there you go, the artichoke is ready to steam and serve with a little melted butter for dipping. 

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    How to Seed a Pomegranate

    Pomegranate seeds add such a festive touch to all kinds of winter dishes, but they can be a real pain to work with because their juice stains your fingers and everything else it comes in touch with—and it's virtually impossible to break open a pomegranate without popping a few seeds. In this video, you'll learn a great method for getting at the seeds without making a mess. The secret is to take it under water.

    Start out by cutting the crown off the pomegranate, which exposes a few seeds at the top. Next, lightly score the pomegranate from the stem end to the crown end, a few places around the fruit. Cut all the way through the skin to the white pith below, but don't cut so deep as to cut the pomegranate into wedges.

    Now plunge the pomegranate into a large bowl of water, and let it soak for about 5 minutes. Working under the water, break the fruit into several large sections, and start freeing the seeds from the membranes—you can see how underwater, you can dig out all the seeds without staining your fingers.

    The other great thing about this technique is that all those tiny bits of white membrane that would normally cling to the seeds in this case just float to the surface of the water. When you've separated all the seeds, just skim away the bits of membrane. Then you can drain the seeds in a colander, and they're ready to go. 

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    How to Shell Fava Beans

    Fresh, tender fava beans are a sure sign of spring. Within a fava pod, each bean is encased in a tough skin that gets more and more bitter as the bean matures, so you'll want to skin each bean before you cook them. In this video, I'll show you an easy way to get those skins off the beans. First, bring a pot of water to a boil before you start opening the pods.  Break open the bean pods. Sometimes you can slide your finger along one side, opening the seam as you would a zipper, but other times you just have to break the pod apart in pieces. Once the water is boiling, blanch the favas in boiling water for one minute, then scoop them out and plunge them into a bowl of ice water. This will loosen the skins so they're easier to remove.  Favas have one wider, slightly flattened end with a scar where it was attached to the shell. Grasp the fava between your fingers with the scar facing up, and with the thumbnail of your other hand, tear into the scar end and peel back. Pinch gently and the fava will slide right out.

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    How to Seed a Mango

    To get to the mango's fruit, you'll need to remove the seed first. In this video, chef and culinary instructor Brian Patterson shows you how it's done, as well as how to remove the mango's skin, so that you can use the fruit in anything from salsas and salads to refreshing desserts.

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    How to Trim Kale and Chard

    Unlike spinach, it takes a fair amount of cooking to turn kale leaves tender, and the stems are nearly impervious to tenderizing. That's why the first step in preparing kale is trimming the stems. In this video, I'll show you how to trim the stems away from kale, a method that works equally well on greens like chard and collards.

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    How to Peel and Mince Garlic

    The more finely you chop your garlic, the more intense the flavor. Senior Food Editor and Test Kitchen Manager Jennifer Armentrout demonstrates how to efficiently peel garlic cloves, as well as how to mince it finely and mash it to a paste.

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    How to Roast Eggplant

    One of the easiest ways to cook eggplant is to simply roast it in the oven—it uses a lot less oil than frying, but you still end up with the same tender, sweet flesh and silky texture. In this video, you'll learn a mostly hands-off way to roast eggplant so it's not at all oily or bitter.  The first step is to salt the eggplant to draw out some of the moisture. Eggplant has a tendency to suck up oil like a sponge when you cook it, and this helps reduce its ability to absorb the oil.  Cut the eggplant in half and score the flesh pretty deeply with the tip of your knife in a cross-hatch pattern. Don't cut all the way through to the skin, but do cut fairly close to it. And you can keep the cuts pretty large.  Press on the edges of the halves to open the cuts and sprinkle kosher salt over the surface and into the cuts. Let the eggplant sit cut side up for about 30 minutes while the salt draws out the water. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 400 degrees._______________________________________________________________________Looking for more ways to cook eggplant? Read How to Cook Eggplant to Tender, Silky Perfection for recipes and tips on roasting, grilling, and frying eggplant._______________________________________________________________________ You won't necessarily see a lot of water on the surface after a half an hour, so you'll want to gently squeeze the eggplant out over the sink or a bowl. That will remove quite a bit of water from the eggplant. Pat the eggplant dry with paper towels. After you've patted the eggplant dry, brush the cut sides generously with olive oil. Set the eggplant on a parchment lined baking sheet—again, cut side down—on top of one or two sprigs of thyme. This gently flavors the eggplant as it roasts. Put the sheet in a 400 degree oven and wait. It takes about an hour for the eggplant to fully roast. The eggplant will collapse and the flesh on the bottom will turn a dark brown, caramelly color. After roasting, let the eggplants cool for at least 20 minutes before handling. Simply roasted eggplant is perfect for making Baba Ghanouj or other dips, or you can just drizzle it with a little vinaigrette and serve it as is for a delicious side dish.  Want more ideas for roasted eggplant? Check out all our roasted eggplant recipes.

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    How to Grill Potatoes

    When summer gets so hot you don't even want to think about turning on the oven, it's a great time for grilled potatoes. They can be a little trickier to grill than other vegetables, because they tend to burn on the outside before they're fully cooked on the inside. Don't worry, though; I'll show you two methods for avoiding this problem so you can enjoy perfectly browned grilled potatoes at your next cookout.

    Visit the Guide to Grilling for more tips as well as hundreds of recipes for grilled chicken, beef, ribs, fish, and vegetables.

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    How to Clean Soft Shell-Crab

    It’s a sure sign of spring when you start to see soft-shell crab in the market. In this video, you’ll learn how to clean soft-shell crab to get it ready for broiling, frying, or grilling.

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    How to Pick Crabmeat

    For dishes like crab cakes or crab salad, you can buy already picked crab meat, but it's more fun to pick the meat off yourself. In this quick lesson from our Test Kitchen, you'll learn how to get the most meat from the crab with the least amount of shell.

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    Shuck Oysters Like a Pro

    In this video tip, Fine Cooking food editor Juli Roberts demonstrates how to shuck an oyster without hurting your hand or losing the flavorful oyster liquor.

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    How to Bone a Chicken Breast

    Though boneless chicken breasts are ubiquitous, if you want a boneless skin-on breast, you'll need to bone out the breast yourself. Fine Cooking's test kitchen manager demonstrates how to neatly remove the bone from a split chicken breast.

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    Butterfly a Chicken

    Learn to butterfly a chicken—that is, cut out the backbone and flatten it—and you have a bird that cooks quickly and evenly. Fine Cooking's test kitchen manager, Jennifer Armentrout, demonstrates this easy technique, which requires nothing more than a set of poultry shears.

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    Cutting a Chicken into Parts

    You can buy pre-cut chicken parts at the grocery store, but cutting up the bird yourself ensures that the pieces are of equal size so they cook evenly. Senior Food Editor/Test Kitchen Manager Jennifer Armentrout demonstrates how to cut a whole chicken into eight serving pieces. 

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    How to Roast a Chicken Perfectly

    Great roast chicken is the measure of any home cook. You want crisp, flavorful skin and moist, juicy meat. You want to fully cook the thighs without overcooking the breast meat. In this episode, I'll share our recipe for the ultimate roast chicken, with all the tips you'll need for delicious results every time.

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    How to Prep a Turkey for Roasting

    First, rub the turkey with a little vegetable or olive oil all over the skin. This will help it brown evenly. The next step is most important: Season the turkey all over with kosher salt and pepper. You want to make sure to get the salt and pepper on the back, then turn it over and season the breast and leg. Don't forget to season inside the cavity, as well. Next, tie the turkey's legs together with kitchen twine; this is called a basic truss. Trussing helps keep the turkey in a nice compact shape, which ensures it will roast evenly. Loop some kitchen twine around each leg joint, tie, and trim the ends.  It's a good idea to trim off the very tips of the wings, because they are so thin they tend to burn, and there's not a lot of meat on them anyway. Tuck the wings back behind the turkey's neck to keep the turkey more stable in the roasting pan. Finally, it's always a good idea to use a roasting rack inside your pan, which keeps the bottom from sitting in the pan juices. A V-rack is ideal because it allows hot air can circulate all around the turkey. Bonus tip: For the juiciest breast meat, start out roasting your turkey breast side down. After 30 minutes, flip the turkey and let it finish roasting breast-side up. Any ridges in the breast from the rack will smooth out by the time the turkey's finished roasting.

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    How to Brine a Turkey

    Making the brine for your Thanksgiving turkey is the simple part—it's finding the fridge space that's a challenge. Senior Food Editor and Test Kitchen Manager Jennifer Armentrout demonstrates two space-saving solutions, using either a brining bag or a small cooler.

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    How to Dry-Brine a Turkey

    Brining has really changed the game for Thanksgiving turkeys. A brine makes the meat juicy, and full of flavor, but it can sometimes keep the skin from getting crispy, and who has the space in their fridge during the holidays for a big pot of brine?  In this video, you'll learn a twist on brining: a dry brine of kosher salt and herbs that draw out the juices, which are then reabsorbed with the flavoring, to make for succulent, tender meat and gloriously crisp skin. Visit the Guide to Thanksgiving Dinner for more turkey recipes, holiday planning tips, and how-to videos. Depending on your recipe, you may have different amounts of salt and different brining times, but the technique is basically the same. For Maria Helm Sinskey's Fresh Herb and Salt-Rubbed Roasted Turkey recipe, apply an herb rub under the skin before dry brining the turkey. First, loosen the skin around the shoulders and the cavity of the turkey. Then mix together 1 Tbs. of olive oil with 2 Tbs. each of chopped fresh thyme and sage, and 2 tsp.of chopped fresh rosemary. Rub the mixture on the meat, under the skin, and especially over the breast and thighs.  For the dry brine, you simply sprinkle 2 oz. of kosher salt all over the turkey, and be sure to rub some of the salt on the inside of the cavity.  Next, tuck the wings behind the neck, and tie the legs together with a piece of kitchen twine. If you weren't brining the turkey, you'd do this right before roasting it, but brining will tighten up the skin so it's better to do this now while you have a limber turkey. Next, put the turkey inside a large food-safe plastic bag—around Thanksgiving, you'll see brining bags and roasting bags in the supermarket, these are both fine to use.  Because the salt draws off quite a bit of liquid from the turkey, it's a good idea to double-bag it, which prevents any leaks in your fridge. Refrigerate the turkey for three days, turning it over once every day. After three days, you can see how much liquid the salt has pulled out of the meat. If we were to roast it right now, you'd have great flavor and tender meat, but there's one last step for that great, crispy skin that everyone loves. Pat the turkey dry all over. Put it in a roasting pan, and refrigerate, unwrapped, overnight. After a night in the fridge, you can see the skin is quite tight, and fairly dry. Your turkey is now ready to roast. When the turkey's done roasting, you'll see that the results of the dry-brine technique are beautiful, crisped brown skin, and moist, juicy meat. 

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    How to Stuff a Turkey

    Some cooks prefer not to stuff a turkey, but for those who do there are a few important considerations. In this video you'll learn the best method for stuffing a turkey and ensuring thorough, even cooking for both the stuffing and the bird.

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    How to Truss a Turkey

    It's not absolutely necessary to truss a turkey, but it is a great method for creating an attractive compact shape. In this short video tip, Fine Cooking test kitchen manager Jennifer Armentrout demonstrates how to truss a turkey. She shows you how to orient the wings to create a stable base, as well as a variation to the standard technique that helps keep the thighs closer to the bird.

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    How to Make Turkey Giblet Broth

    Learn how to make an aromatic broth from turkey giblets you can use to make a rich, flavorful gravy for your Thanksgiving turkey.

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    Is the Turkey Done?

    The biggest challenge when roasting a turkey is making sure it’s fully cooked—but not overcooked. In this video, you'll learn how—and when—to check your turkey for doneness, so your turkey is juicy, tender and delicious.

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    How to Make Gravy for Brined Turkey

    Learn how to make a flavorful herb gravy for a brined turkey using just a touch of the pan juices.

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    How to Bone a Turkey Thigh

    Test Kitchen expert Nicki Sizemore shows you how to use a boning knife to bone-out a turkey thigh.

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    How to Bone a Turkey Breast

    A whole turkey breast is a great option when you're serving Thanksgiving to a smaller crowd, but most are sold bone-in. Learn how to use a sharp boning knife to free up and remove the wish bone, rib cage, and breast bone from the turkey in preparation for stuffing or roasting it.  

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    How to Carve a Roast Turkey

    There's more than one way to carve a turkey. In this video tip you'l learn two methods for carving a turkey—one for carving at the table, and one for carving in the kitchen.

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    How to Roast a Beef Tenderloin

    Learn how to make a perfectly roasted beef tenderloin for your next special occasion or holiday meal

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    How to Carve a Leg of Lamb

    A whole, roasted leg of lamb is an impressive centerpiece for Easter or any special meal, but because it's one of those special-occasion roasts, it can be unfamiliar and daunting to carve. In this video, you'll learn how to carve a whole leg of lamb into slices. For the most tender results, the trick is to carve against the grain of the meat.  Cutting a few slices in the same direction as the leg bone is probably the easiest way to carve the leg, since the bone won't get in the way, but if you look at slices cut this way, you'll see the long fibers of meat--carving in this direction is going along with the grain of the meat, and that means your lamb will be chewier and less tender than it could be. So now that I've cut these few slices, I'm going to turn the leg over and rest it on this flat area I created, which will stabilize it. And the rest of the slices I'm going to cut against the grain of the meat.  Make a series of cuts perpendicular to the bone. You can make these as thick or thin as you like--I'm cutting these between a quarter and a half-inch thick. Cut all the way down to the bone. Now I turn my knife so it's parallel to the bone, and I'm going to release all those slices I made with one long cut.  Now I've got a flat surface on this side of the leg, I'll turn it over and repeat the same process on the other side: first a series of cuts perpendicular to the bone, and then one long cut to release them.  And now let's compare these slices that I cut against the grain with those first few slices I cut with the grain. You can see the texture of the against-the-grain slices is much less fibrous looking, it seems almost more finely grained. This means that the lamb you serve will be perfectly tender and delicious.

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    How to French a Rack of Lamb

    Frenching a rack of lamb—that is, removing the meat, fat and membranes that connect the individual rib bones—gives the rack a clean look for an elegant meal, and is a satisfying butchering technique you can do at home with a little practice. Senior Food Editor/Test Kitchen Manager Jennifer Armentrout demonstrates how it's done.

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    How to Pound a Paillard

    A paillard is a boneless piece of chicken, veal, or pork that's been pounded into a thin cutlet for quick cooking. Senior Food Editor/Test Kitchen Manager Jennifer Armentrout gives some tips for pounding out a paillard evenly without tearing the meat.

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    How to Bread a Cutlet

    Whether you're breading chicken, pork, or even vegetables, the same basic steps of flour, beaten egg, and breadcrumbs ensures a crisp, uniform coating. Senior Food Editor and Test Kitchen Manager Jennifer Armentrout demonstrates how to bread cutlets neatly and efficiently.

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    How to Roll Out a Pie Crust

    Rolling out pie dough and transferring it into a pie plate is the step in pie-making that often makes new bakers (and even some pros) anxious. The dough could crack while you’re rolling or tear while you’re moving it over to the plate. And just about every baker has had pie dough stick to the counter.
    In this video, baking expert Abby Dodge teaches you how to roll out a dough that’s even, round, doesn’t stick, and gets into the pie plate in one piece.

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    How to Crimp a Pie Crust

    A neatly fluted crust prevents your pie from slumping during baking and hold lots of delicious fillings. Learn a simple technique for perfectly crimped pie crust. 

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    How to Make Decorative Pie Crust Edges

    Once you’ve mastered the basic method for crimping a pie crust, you can start experimenting with more decorative edges. In this video, you'll learn how to make three different decorative edges for your pie crusts: one with big wide scallops, one that looks like a twisted rope, and one that looks like a shaft of wheat, an especially nice touch for Thanksgiving pies. You can create any of these edges in less than 5 minutes, and none of the edges require any special equipment beyond a pair of kitchen shears. ________________________________________________________________ Thanksgiving HeadquartersVisit The Guide to Thanksgiving Dinner for more holiday how-to and hundreds of recipes for pie, turkey, and sides. Also, check out Baker's Central for more recipes, videos, and a free downloadable baker's guide.More Pie Tips & TricksFor more information on how how to bake perfect pies, watch the sneak peek of the Fine Cooking Culinary School Video Series: Pies & Tarts with Abby Johnson Dodge.________________________________________________________________ 

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    How to Blind-Bake Pie Crust

    Blind baking a pie crust means giving an empty crust a head start in the oven before filling and baking the entire pie. It’s an especially important step for holiday pies like pecan and pumpkin because it helps keep the crust from getting soggy.

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    How to Make Lemon Curd

    Creamy lemon curd is a versatile topping or filling for many desserts. And though it’s very simple to make, it is prone to curdling or scrambling. In this video, you’ll learn a method for making lemon curd that’s guaranteed to turn out silky and smooth without straining.

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    How to Make Caramel

    Making your own caramel is a simple process. But there are a few pitfalls to watch for. In this video, you’ll learn how to make a basic caramel that stays liquid and is perfectly cooked. You’ll also learn how to turn the caramel into an easy, creamy sauce.

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    How to Caramelize Crème Brûlée

    Homemade crème brûlée is even better than any you'll have in a restaurant, but it does require mastering the right tool: a mini blowtorch, which helps you achieve that perfectly crackly, crunchy crust over cool custard. 

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    How to Pull and Torch Meringue Frosting

    A torched meringue frosting adds even more height and drama to a layer cake. Test kitchen contributor Nicki Sizemore shows how to make the meringue, sculpt it into peaks and spikes, and finally torch it for a toasty, caramelized finish.

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    How to Make Buttercream Frosting

    Fine Cooking 's test kitchen manager, Jennifer Armentrout, demonstrates a simplified technique for classic Italian buttercream, which uses corn syrup in addition to sugar, so no candy thermometer is needed.

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    Frosting a Layer Cake

    An impressive layer cake is easier than it looks. Fine Cooking's test kitchen manager, Jennifer Armentrout, walks you through all the steps in frosting your layer cake, from splitting the cake layers to swirling the frosting in a pretty pattern.

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    How to Butter and Flour a Cake Pan

    Test Kitchen Manager Jennifer Armentrout shares her tips for preparing cake pans so that cakes release perfectly and look beautiful.

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    How to Shape an Ice Cream Quenelle

    A quenelle is a simple way to add a restaurant-y touch to ice cream or any dessert garnished with ice cream, and it only takes a few minutes once you get the hang of it. Test kitchen associate Dabney Gough demonstrates how it's done.

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Season 4 Extras

Topping, VA (409)

Pete welcomes us to Virginia on this episode of Moveable Feast, where we meet skilled oystermen Ryan & Travis Croxton, as well as chef Dylan Fultineer. Dylan brings Pete to…

View all Moveable Feast recipes and video extras

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