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Ingredient

Kosher Salt

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A.K.A

koshering salt (in the UK)

What is it?

Kosher salt, so named because it’s used in the process of koshering meats, has a larger grain than table salt. It usually contains no additives, though some kosher salts do contain iodine, which is more commonly found in table salts. Kosher is easy to pinch and sprinkle, making it the choice of most chefs for seasoning meat, fish, and poultry. It also sticks to foods better, and it dissolves more quickly. Compared to table salt, which can taste sharp and one-dimensional, kosher salt has a delicious salty flavor and a nice crunch.

Table salt, however, if often preferred in baking recipes because it disperses better in dry ingredients and its standard crystal size makes for more consistent measurement.

Kitchen math:

Different brands of kosher salt have crystals of different sizes and shapes. That means that the same volume of salt can have dramatically different weights (and thus contibute far more or saltiness), depending on the brand. For instance: 1/4 cup Diamond Crystal brand kosher salt = 1 oz. 1/4 cup Morton’s brand kosher salt = 2 oz. Most recipes call for kosher salt to taste, but if you need a measured amount—especially a large amount, such as in a brine—it’s best to measure by weight.

Don’t have it?

Table salt and sea salt can substitute; use less table salt and a little more sea salt.

How to choose:

Diamond Crystal brand’s hollow flakes dissolve quickly (which is especially important in baking). Other brands of kosher salt have harder, slower dissolving flakes.

How to prep:

To use for general seasoning, pinch the coarse salt between your thumb, index finger, and middle finger, hold it high over your pan, and then rub your fingers back and forth to release the salt while circling your hand over the pan or cut of meat to distribute it evenly.

How to store:

Kept dry and cool, kosher salt lasts indefinitely. Keep some in a salt cellar, small bowl, or wooden box, and set it next to your stove to use for seasoning.

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Comments

  • Ashtonjames | 05/12/2016

    thanks for sharing this information

  • Martharena | 03/05/2014

    So, if salt is salt, all from the sea, why should table salt taste "sharp" & without " dimension"? I understand a coarse grain possibly sticking better to food or minerals being "absorbed" into salts from different sites, but I'm beginning to feel its a little snobby for soooo many recipes to call for kosher salt. I'm sure its not all blessed.

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