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Cookbook Giveaway - Pig: King of the Southern Table

Review:
Pig: King of the Southern Table, by James Villas (Wiley, $35)

From snout to shoulder and hock to tail, award-winning author James Villas leaves none of the noble hog unrelished in this 300-strong collection of southern dishes. There’s something for everyone. Weeknight cooks will turn straight to recipes like the Bacon Meat Loaf and Creole Pork Steaks. Beer-Braised Spiced Barbecued Spareribs and Arkansas Black Barbecued Back Ribs will excite the aspiring pit master. And for the intrepid gourmet, a chapter on variety and specialty meats offers a trove of goodies, including Mississippi Crusted Pigs’ Ears and Hog’s Head Stew.

Excerpted Recipes:

Roast Pork Tenderloin Stuffed with Honeyed Apples and Pecans Baked Smithfield Ham with Bourbon, Honey, and Pecan Glaze Creole Ham, Sausage, and Shrimp Jambalaya
Roast Pork Tenderloin Stuffed with Honeyed Apples and Pecans   Baked Smithfield Ham with Bourbon, Honey, and Pecan Glaze   Creole Ham, Sausage, and Shrimp Jambalaya

Win a Copy of Pig:
Have a Southern favorite of your own or love pork in all its forms? Post a comment below and tell me about it. I'll pick one comment at random on Friday, June 4, 2010 and send the lucky winner a copy of the book.

Update: Cograts to dineindiva; her comment was the random pick, so she's this week's cookbook giveaway winner!

posted in: Blogs, pork, Ham, pork tenderloin, jambalaya, pig, James Villas, southern food
Comments (69)

cammilla writes: My most used and favorite way to cook a ham is also the easiest. Begin with your preferred ham cut, mine is just a regular mostly cooked leg of pork. In a large baking dish, on a rack, cook the ham for about an hour, covered until it's nicely heated. Remove the cover (foil or whatever) and slather on a topping made with hot pepper jelly (2 parts) and one part whole grain mustard (1 part). I heat the topping up, just so it's easier to apply. How hot the topping is depends upon the type of pepper jelly you use. The one I use is quite hot and the mustard actually tones it down some. The glaze forms a sweet/hot/tart crust that is just delicious. Makes a remarkable main course, and yummy sandwiches. Try it, you'll like it! Posted: 4:57 pm on June 12th

LDB34 writes: My family loves it when I cooked boneless pork chops smothered in onions and gravy, it's our Wed. night special. Mmm mmm good. Posted: 5:43 pm on June 4th

Texas_Foodie writes: We bought a pig at an auction - picking it up from the slaughter house next week! I can't wait to try some new recipes. Posted: 1:32 pm on June 4th

Buttercupski writes: There is no more versatile animal than PIG. KING. YUM! Posted: 12:00 pm on June 4th

ICDOCEAN1 writes: Oh I just loved the ribs that I recently made using my new smoker, roaster, grill. There are neat hanging hooks for the slabs of ribs and I placed a rack above the ribs that held a variety of sausages that dripped wonderful juices over the ribs as they smoke. Pork heaven, once the ribs were smoked and then wrapped and cooked for an additional 1 1/2 hours or so, brushed with sauce and grilled for a little added crispness. Served with smoked bacon wrapped stuffed jalapenos among other things. Posted: 9:13 am on June 4th

blubarry writes: There is a charcuterie here in Ottawa that serves amazing pork belly, and they offer a special appetizer for 10 people that consists of an entire pig's head served family style. Incredible! Posted: 7:38 am on June 4th

TheLonelyRadish writes: I love smothered pork chops, and potato sausage is one of the greatest things there is. Posted: 10:11 pm on June 3rd

jaclyne writes: bacon, loin, chops, snout, ears, cured, dried...love em all! Posted: 9:27 pm on June 3rd

Galley_Slave writes: Whats the definition of eternity? Two people and a ham.
Ham and cheese omlette, pea soup, mac and cheese and ham, ham and eggs, stir fried rice with ham, the varieties are endless. Posted: 3:22 pm on June 3rd

mellian writes: Bacon Explosion! I read about this dish and my husband had to go out and make it. Sausage wrapped in thick slicked bacon like a meatloaf, and smoked.

Heavenly! But VERY rich!

Posted: 2:39 pm on June 3rd

lisi_jones writes: My friend and I are raising two piglets this summer. They arrive this week. Hers will be named Ham, as they have a four year old boy and they'd like to make it clear to him what the pig's destiny is. Mine will be named Green Eggs, because Green Eggs & Ham go together like barbecue and beer! This book will be great to help me find interesting recipes for my 200+ pounds of pork - especially the less common parts. Posted: 2:15 pm on June 3rd

ArabianKnits writes: We love pork products so much, we buy a whole one, on the hoof, each year and keep everything we can, including the jowls, hocks and lard to render at home.

There are few things that aren't improved with pork products. :)

One of my favorite things to do with it is make red beans and rice. Delicious! Posted: 2:07 pm on June 3rd

Terriyaki2 writes: I make killer pulled pork in the crock pot. And I love to BBQ ribs with my own barbeque sauce that takes 1 1/2 hours to make. (Can't give you the sauce recipe!) I also collect cookbooks and would love to add this one! Posted: 2:06 pm on June 3rd

cookaholic writes: I don't think there is one part of a pig that I don't love. Pulled pork, Kalua Pig, Bacon, Grilled Pork Loin, BBQ Ribs, you name it and I love it! I am thrilled that the heirloom breeds are coming back in style. I hope I win the book - I can always use new ideas for preparing my favorite meat! Posted: 2:05 pm on June 3rd

smerkler writes: A friend of mine makes some amazing smoked pork shoulder. Moist, juicy, full of flavor, and served with homemade barbecue sauce. It's so good that I'm about to buy my very own smoker and make it myself for the first time! Posted: 2:00 pm on June 3rd

JackieBaisa writes: I absolutely adore pork in all of its forms, but my favorite is probably a good Schweineschnitzel (German breaded pork cutlet). Posted: 1:59 pm on June 3rd

DianesFoodBlog writes: I love my Duroc baby back ribs slow grilled, and my most recent interesting 'pig' was done in the crock pot with Coca Cola and condensed milk, of all things - fantastic!! Posted: 1:53 pm on June 3rd

Angry_Butter writes: I absolutely love the pig! I recently made kalua pork in my slow cooker with homemade smoked salt and the traditional banana leaves and then turned the leftovers into pulled pork sandwiches with homemade bbq sauce! Later this month I'm actually hosting an "everything is better with bacon" party in which i'll serve my famous blue cheese stuffed bacon wrapped dates and some other treats using recipes I'm finding in cookbooks and online. I've even ordered the bacon flavored envelopes and am going to make pig themed invitations on my computer. I love how versatile a pig is and how different the flavors can be from the various cuts Anyone who thinks they don't like pork should come to my house! Posted: 6:18 pm on June 2nd

dineindiva writes: I love pork from snout to tail. I am looking forward to my CSA pig share. I've watched them grow and play and like that they have had loving care. Posted: 5:34 pm on June 2nd

Nedra writes: Aloha. In Hawaii, we have a dish called Kalua Pig! It starts with a great piece of pork, add some Hawaiian salt, liquid smoke, wrap it in banana leaves and cook til it falls off the bone and melts in your mouth. Mix with steamed cabbage and enjoy. So ono.... Posted: 2:32 pm on June 2nd

Patty951 writes: I have but one word for you ...CRACKLE ... the skin from a pig roasted all day on a spit over glowing coals. As kids we fought to be the one to get the biggest chunk of crackle.
Nothing on a spit compares to a pig! Posted: 1:01 pm on June 2nd

foodisfine writes: I help cook and serve a whole pig once. What a great experience, croud loving presentation. Posted: 11:25 am on June 2nd

debwil writes: always love to have some pork on my big green egg!!!! Posted: 10:53 am on June 2nd

historyvoyager writes: Slow smoked pulled pork with Memphis style slaw (pile the slaw on top of the pork), baked beans and a tall glass of iced sweet tea. A sweet ending would be a big slice of Red Velvet cake. Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm! Posted: 6:44 pm on June 1st

thomas48 writes: As a boy, my Dad & Grandad would cook a whole hog over coals. A pit in the ground, covered with staked hog wire. Hog was place on the wire, back down. Oak logs were burned and the coals were shoveled under the hog evenly. Takes 12 to 14 hours of slow cooking. We kept an extra fire burning to warm us. All of us sat around and mostly listened to the adults talk about their lives and tell stories to all. We were all so amazed at the stories, smell of the fire, hot chocolate and the smell of the cooking. We all were able to stay up all night to enjoy. My Grandad used a vineger/ mustard base seasoned with black and red peppers. A makeshift mop made from a fresh sheet and axe handle was used to swap the entire hog all night long. When done you could just pull the meat off with your fingers, and talking about good- Best in the world. I am from South Carolina and I know that the best comes from there. I would trade nothing for those times nor the company or the food. This can always be done on a smaller scale. Try it and you will fall in love with it. Time for family and friends. Posted: 6:11 pm on June 1st

thomas48 writes: As a boy, my Dad & Grandad would cook a whole hog over coals. A pit in the ground, covered with staked hog wire. Hog was place on the wire, back down. Oak logs were burned and the coals were shoveled under the hog evenly. Takes 12 to 14 hours of slow cooking. We kept an extra fire burning to warm us. All of us sat around and mostly listened to the adults talk about their lives and tell stories to all. We were all so amazed at the stories, smell of the fire, hot chocolate and the smell of the cooking. We all were able to stay up all night to enjoy. My Grandad used a vineger/ mustard base seasoned with black and red peppers. A makeshift mop made from a fresh sheet and axe handle was used to swap the entire hog all night long. When done you could just pull the meat off with your fingers, and talking about good- Best in the world. I am from South Carolina and I know that the best comes from there. I would trade nothing for those times nor the company or the food. This can always be done on a smaller scale. Try it and you will fall in love with it. Time for family and friends. Posted: 6:11 pm on June 1st

iceskatingschnauzer writes: Pulled pork? Sheer heaven, with just the right amount of saucy goodness. Yum! Posted: 4:44 pm on June 1st

pinoychef writes: "Pig" or pork is my Favorite ,and our favorite since childhood, for me it's truly the ultimate versatile meat to use in any dish from barbeques, hams, to a whole roasted pig, back home in Philippines we called it "lechon" golden delicious crispy skin and very juicy plump,almost falling apart meat inside ;-), also my all time pinoy(filipino) favorite "Pork Adobo" pork marinated with garlic,vinegar,soy and spices and stewed for an hour, hmmm... Delicious!!! my imagination just keep coming when we talk about pork. At work everybody knows, I Love Pork, 'coz whenever there's pork i make something delicious ;-) all i can say " I LOVE PORK !!! " Posted: 2:40 pm on June 1st

gr8chefmb writes: My most favourite dish is a pork butt covered with sage and slow-baked until it is fall-apart tender. Mom would put quartered potatoes in the bottom of the roasting pan about halfway through cooking. She would serve it with some sauerkraut heated up with butter and brown sugar and some chunky applesace. Mmmmmmm! Wish I had some now! I also love a good split pea soup with leftover ham that we used to have after Easter. :-) Of course, my most favourite memory is from a TV sitcom - the Brady Bunch - when Peter keeps going around saying 'Pork chops and applesauce!' LOL! :-) Posted: 2:14 pm on June 1st

janifani writes: Memorial Day had an even more special meaning this year as our son is currently deployed, he's a Navy Corpsman. We always have a family barbeque, so this year we made a special rosemary dry rub for a beautiful rack of baby back ribs, corn on the cob and grilled sweet potato spears. Would love to have a copy "Pig" as my go to book for all our upcoming family gatherings! Posted: 2:07 pm on June 1st

bottled_livefire writes: My Croatian friends had a pig roast to die for.
They used lump charcoal, in a new foil-lined mortar pan. A small electric motor was used for the spit (rotisserie). The pig was poked all over and garlic slivers inserted, the skin was smoothed back, covering the garlic, so the garlic wouldn't burn. Using new chicken wire, sprayed with food release, the wire was trimmed just enough to encase the pig. They kept the fire around 300F, adding coals to maintain temp, basted the pig with melted butter, cracked black pepper, and Vegamite (a seasoning blend). It was spit-roasted until you could twist a foreleg.
All the equipment was purchased brand new just for this event, and then re-used only for pig roasts. Posted: 2:05 pm on June 1st

janifani writes: We love pork at our house, especially this time of year. We love to barbeque every cut of pork from chops to ribs. Our favorite is a pork loin stuffed with green olives, mushroom, roasted red bell peppers and feta cheese with a little olive oil and seasoned bread crumbs to help it all come together! It doesn't get any better than this! It all goes great with a nice glass of red wine and garlic roasted potatoes! Posted: 2:01 pm on June 1st

talberts writes: Pork Medallions in a Blueberry demi-glace. Can't wait! Posted: 1:13 pm on June 1st

iuseathimble writes: My husband's fondest memories of his business trips to Germany involve the wonderful pork - "real" pork, not the super-lean pork we usually find in the supermarket. I bought some locally raised heritage pork at the farmer's market which is much like that flavorful German pork. Posted: 1:12 pm on June 1st

iuseathimble writes: One of the nicest, most useful presents we ever received was a ham from St. Louis, cured Italian-style like prosciutto. We used it to flavor and enhance many dishes. Posted: 1:10 pm on June 1st

iuseathimble writes: Southern cooking, like all things American, is a melting pot - our favorite southern cuisine is New Orleans' Creole and Cajun fare, the ultimate in melting pots (usually with wonderful pork sausage in it!) Posted: 1:09 pm on June 1st

mostracing writes: If it doesnt have bacon, butter, and onions; Why eat it? Posted: 1:02 pm on June 1st

calliehoo writes: i know they're everywhere now, but it was when i was in the south that i learned to love greens -- especially kale. growing up in the midwest, it was never a part of my diet, but once i went to college in the south, greens ruled the table! Posted: 12:20 pm on June 1st

mhleslie writes: "It's no disgrace to get sauce on your face." - anon Posted: 12:17 pm on June 1st

ranger99 writes: I remember traveling from Oregon to North Carolina as a young teenager and going to my first pig-pickin! The pork was wonderful, with a western Carolina Vinegar and mustard based sauce, but the cracklin's were out of this world. I ate so much that my mom became concerned! One of my favorite childhood memories for sure!!

We are now planning on roasting a whole hog at our upcoming family reunion on the Oregon coast this summer and I really need a copy of "PIG, KING OF THE SOUTHERN TABLE"!! Posted: 12:09 pm on June 1st

Reba007 writes: I am picking up half a pig today. Can't wait! Posted: 11:31 am on June 1st

contessa writes: Growing up as a child, my mom(the best cook in the world) would have a lot of different pork dishes-my favorite being the pork with the handles on it (pork chops with bones to hold same while eating so I could get every bit of that wonderful taste), roast fresh ham, and most recently pork tenderloins. Of course in the "old days", there was more fat which would restrict me today. So I laud the leaner versions. My grandparents would have a pig roast on Saturday nights but I wasn't there because I wasn't born yet. I am anxious to try the pork tenderloin stuffed with apple, honey, and cashews-sounds yummy.

I am 86 and still young enough to try new appealing recipes. Posted: 11:16 am on June 1st

chefpdi writes: We love pulled pork! I smoke it on our Weber charcoal grill (usually 2-3 at a time) and we put the leftovers in baggies in the freezer so we can have it for lunch over the next month. It makes everyone at work soooo jealous! Pork tenderloin is also a favorite, but nothing beats a good, slow-cooked pork and sauerkraut with homemade mashed potatoes! Pure heaven! Posted: 11:01 am on June 1st

thecorbettkid writes: pulled pork is an easy favourite at this house! Posted: 10:42 am on June 1st

Lynn_C writes: Ham is wonderful, but bacon wins hands down. Everything is better with bacon! Posted: 10:40 am on June 1st

Belarra writes: Love pork,so savoury and moist.I just did a roast pork on the barbeque spit.It was so good and moist.My husband and I have been eating more pork these days.Pulled pork is also one of our favourites. Posted: 10:30 am on June 1st

CPeterman writes: Pork chops were my favorite meal growing up, then I got away from eating meat as an adult and am recently finding my way back to the joys of eating and cooking pork. Posted: 10:28 am on June 1st

pianogirl119 writes: Being a farm girl, pork was a staple at our house. We raised pigs. When I grew up and married I was amazed that my husband didn't have much of it growing up (except the occasional pork chops or bacon). Over the past 35 years I have introduced him to over dozens of dishes from the lowly ham loaf to pulled pork to pork tenderloin.
Hard to pick one favorite, but a Pork Loin Roast is family favorite. Hard to beat a fine pork gravy for flavor! Posted: 10:23 am on June 1st

Bruha writes: No meat is better than pork! "PIG" will be my how-to reference. My family loves bacon and I have got the cooking down to a science. I separate the slices (no big cold clunk of bacon in the pan) Start on high heat and have a spoon, fork and some kind of container next to the pan. As the bacon's fat turns liquid push some of the slices toward the
center of the pan. Lower the heat. Carefully tip the pan and spoon up the liquid into the container-get as much out of the pan as possible. Turn the bacon push,tip and spoon up.

The trick is keeping the pan somewhat dry. Don't let it get too dark and burn. Perfection is a golden brown, crispy piece of bacon......or two...or three...and then some! Posted: 10:05 am on June 1st

swissjoyce writes: the other white meat, yum yum, we eat a lot of pork and will try this receipe it sounds like a good dinner party! We do a pork loin on our set it and forget it, so easy and so good. Posted: 9:57 am on June 1st

chomos writes: My dad made me a La Caja China-style hog roaster a few years ago after I read an article about it in the NY Times. I buy a 70-80 pound pig and inject it with an orange juice and spice marinade and rub it down with salt before roasting it for 4-5 hours under hot coals. The meat just falls off the bone! My other favorite is the cochon de lait po-boys in New Orleans. Not sure how they make it but it is one of the best sandwiches ever... Posted: 9:23 am on June 1st

Little_Betty writes: Grew up loving pork. Every year our family has the tradition of getting together and making sausage. This year hoping to start a new family tradition of roasting a whole pig at our first family reunion. Posted: 9:20 am on June 1st

minnieme writes: My family is from Hawaii and we love pork. My favorite is kahlua pork that's slow cooked in the ground. I would never have thought that I would eat pig feet, but my father used to make a pig feet miso soup that was finger-licking good. Posted: 9:16 am on June 1st

stephaniemvandellen writes: There is nothing better than pulled pork, hands down. Posted: 9:05 am on June 1st

rccola writes: I love pork everything but the innards, we had BBQ ribs on Sunday may do a shoulder with kraut today. Posted: 8:43 am on June 1st

erikbledsoe writes: I recently discovered Benton's bacon, produced by a small family-run business in Madisonville, TN. If you are ever in east Tennessee it is worth seeking out. And if you see it featured on the menu of high end restaurants, I recommend trying it. Posted: 8:39 am on June 1st

Joe_A writes: Pork butt made anyway but preferably smoked after a brine. Posted: 8:37 am on June 1st

MaryMargret writes: Made grilled pork tenderloin marinated in olive oil, fresh rosemary (from my garden), garlic and wine vinegar for a crowd at the shore this weekend. Even my sister-in-law liked it and she's like Mikey, she usually hates everything Posted: 8:27 am on June 1st

andycjr writes: Had slowcooked baby backs last night....my favorite. Posted: 8:14 am on June 1st

kennelgirlbev writes: Our favorite "oink-out" is to oven roast a butt and then finish it in the stove top smoker with hickory and pecan smoke for the most divine pulled pork--you'd swear it had been smoking over a wood fire for hours and so moist! And I can't leave out the ubiquitous tenderloin stuffed with a cornbread and andouille stuffing , grilled, and finished with either a hot pepper jelly glaze or a muscadine jelly glaze. Oink, oink, oink----ummmm. Posted: 12:29 pm on May 30th

shannonc1986 writes: i'd have to go with the pulled pork for ease of making with tastiness of flavor, but cold spiral ham on a warm biscuit also does the trick for me. Posted: 6:23 am on May 30th

BarbaraEC writes: I buy tenderloins and slice then, pound them and make little breaded schnitzel. I love pigs. Posted: 4:20 pm on May 29th

pjhopper writes: Bacon, ribs, sausage, ham. I love pork. I just ordered a half pig for the first time. This book would be so useful. Posted: 10:06 am on May 29th

Pielove writes: Tomorrow we will be beer-poaching and grilling 15 pounds of Sheboygan-style bratwurst for a few dozen of our closest friends. So, I will have to say sausage of just about any type (even kishka!). Posted: 9:42 pm on May 28th

ICOOKFORYOU writes: I just adore pulled pork barbecue with a great hickory smoke flavor and sweet barbecue sauce mixed in. Put this wonderful pork on a fresh bun and top with a sweet coleslaw with sweet pickle relish. It doen't get much better than this. Posted: 10:20 pm on May 27th

pinkpansy writes: Ham for Christmas, Easter and all special and not so special events. It doesn't get any better. Posted: 7:38 pm on May 27th

pinkpansy writes: Ham for Christmas, Easter and all special and not so special ocassions. It doesn't get any better. Posted: 7:37 pm on May 27th

summarann writes: definitely sweet tea! :-} Posted: 7:10 pm on May 27th

jmf1563 writes: a ham biscuit with sweet tea *sigh* Posted: 6:03 pm on May 27th

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