Recipes using all-purpose flour - FineCooking.com

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all-purpose flour

all-purpose flour
a.k.a.

AP flour

what is it?

True to its name, all-purpose flour is a good choice for all kinds of baking because it has a middle-of-the-road protein content (between 9 and 13%). Cakes made with cake flour might be more tender, and loaves made with bread flour might rise higher, but the differences are subtle. All-purpose flour is also a good choice for other cooking jobs tackled by flour, such as thickening sauces and coating foods.

kitchen math:

4.5 oz. all purpose flour = 1 cup

don't have it?

In a pinch, you can use cake flour (add 2 tablespoons more cake flour per 1 cup all-purpose flour)

how to choose:

Unless a recipe states otherwise, use unbleached all-purpose flour. Bleached flour contains additives that whiten flour and, in some cases, affect its baking properties.

how to prep:

For most accurate measuring, use a scale. Fluff the flour with a fork to avoid densely packed flour. Spoon the flour from the bag into a dry measuring cup and level it with a knife. Never scoop right form the bag, which would compact too much flour into the measuring cup. Don't shake or tap the cup as this packs down the flour, too.

how to store:

Store flour in an airtight container in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight.

Comments (1)

PeteSuffolk writes: Don't forget us Europeans! In England we call this Plain Flour, and what you call cake flour, we call Self Raising Flour. I am constantly checking on Google when using American recipes to make sure I know what you are talking about! There is a big world out there and we don't all speak American! Posted: 11:50 am on August 29th

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