Guide to Grilled Steak, from A-Z - FineCooking.com

My Recipe Box

Guide to Grilled Steak, from A-Z

Park Ulrich is the executive chef at Epic Roasthouse and Waterbar in San Francisco.

Park Ulrich is the executive chef at Epic Roasthouse and Waterbar in San Francisco.

By Fine Cooking Editors, editor

June 4th, 2014

 

N - Naked
Though I love a good marinade or spice rub on cheaper cuts, I tend to cook my best quality steaks naked. (Not me-the steak!) Well, practically naked; as mentioned earlier, I always season steak with salt and pepper.

O - Oil
To keep your steak from sticking (and help promote grill marks), oil the grill grates with a paper towel dipped in oil once they're hot.

P - Porterhouse (and other luxury cuts)
Porterhouse, one of the most popular and priciest cuts of beef, contains two of the most tender cuts, the tenderloin and the short loin (aka New York strip), divided by a T-shaped bone. It's a honkin' big and thick piece of meat, so invite a few friends over and let the porterhouse be the talk of the dinner. Other indulgent cuts include ribeye, sirloin, and tenderloin.

Grilled Porterhouse Steak with Chimichurri Sauce Grilled Top Sirloin Rib-Eye Steaks Rubbed with Coffee and Cocoa
Grilled Porterhouse Steak with Chimichurri Sauce   Grilled Top Sirloin   Rib-Eye Steaks Rubbed with Coffee and Cocoa

 

Q - Quadrillage
A fancy way to say "those crosshatched grill marks you get on a steak when you lift it off the grate and turn it 90 degrees halfway through searing." I don't usually do this for my steaks, but you can. See the New York Strip Steaks with Blue Cheese Butter for a beautiful example.

R - Rest
One of the most important steps to grilling a great steak is rest. Before serving, let the steak sit somewhere warm for 5 to 10 minutes so that its juice, which has been driven to the center by heat, has a chance to redistribute and the muscle relaxes. If you skip this step, your steak will not be as tender and juicy as it should be.

Test Kitchen Tip: For juicier meat, give it a rest

S - Spice rubs
Rubbing steaks with spices creates a savory crust. You don't need a thick coating (just use whatever sticks to the meat), but the longer you leave it on before grilling, the deeper the flavor will be.

Five-Spice Rub 
Spice-Rubbed Grilled Steaks Tex-Mex Rub for Steak (or Chicken)
Five-Spice Rub   Spice-Rubbed Grilled Steaks   Tex-Mex Rub for Steak (or Chicken)

posted in: Blogs, grilling
Comments (0)
You must be logged in to post comments. Log in.

Cookbooks, DVDs & More