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Recipe

Apple Turnovers

Joanne Smart

Yield: Yields 8 large turnovers.

When the first few nights turn chilly, all thoughts go to baking—and apples. These turnovers are a classic guaranteed to fill your kitchen with the homey smells of fall. You also use this wonderful, flaky dough to make open-faced rustic tarts called galettes. If you don’t want to make all of the turnovers at once, you can freeze some of the dough, well wrapped. Defrost in the refrigerator before rolling it out.

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • 10 oz. (2-1/4 cups) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. granulated sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. table salt
  • 6 oz. (12 Tbs.) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces and chilled
  • 1/2 cup ice water

For the filling:

  • About 3 Tbs. all-purpose flour
  • About 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 large apples (about 2 lb. total), peeled, halved, and cored; each half quartered lengthwise
  • About 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 2 Tbs. unsalted butter, melted
  • Granulated sugar, for sprinkling

Nutritional Information

  • Nutritional Sample Size per turnover
  • Calories (kcal) : 470
  • Fat Calories (kcal): 190
  • Fat (g): 21
  • Saturated Fat (g): 13
  • Polyunsaturated Fat (g): 1
  • Monounsaturated Fat (g): 6
  • Cholesterol (mg): 55
  • Sodium (mg): 150
  • Carbohydrates (g): 70
  • Fiber (g): 3
  • Protein (g): 4

Preparation

Make the dough.

  • In a mixing bowl, combine the 10 oz. flour, the 1 tsp. sugar, and the salt. Cut the butter into the flour mixture, using a pastry cutter or your fingers, until the butter bits are pea-size. (You can also use a food processor or a stand mixer, just be sure not to overmix the dough.) Add the water all at once and mix until the dough just comes together. Divide the dough and shape it into two disks.
  • Cut each disk into quarters. With lightly floured hands, shape each quarter into a flat oval about 3 inches long and 2 inches wide. Cover the ovals with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least half an hour.

Assemble and bake the turnovers:

  • Line two baking sheets with kitchen parchment. Heat the oven to 400°F. Flour a smooth work surface well. With a rolling pin, roll each piece of dough into a larger oval, approximately 10 inches long and 6 inches wide. The dough should be almost paper-thin. Brush off any excess flour.
  • Spoon 1 tsp. flour and 1 tsp. sugar on one half of each oval. Reassemble half an apple on each pile of flour and sugar. Sprinkle 2 tsp. sugar and a pinch of cinnamon over the apple.

  • Fold the other half of the oval over the apples so that it falls just shy of the edge of the bottom half. Gently mold the dough around the apple to eliminate any trapped air. Fold the edge of the bottom half up over the edge of the top half and press to seal. Flute the edge as you would a pie. Brush the top of the turnovers with the melted butter and sprinkle with additional sugar. Bake until golden brown, 45 to 50 minutes. Use a spatula to move the turnovers from the baking sheet to a cooling rack. These are best served warm but are also good at room temperature.

Reviews

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Reviews

  • User avater
    EMM3773 | 01/20/2018

    Great recipe, here are my notes: it took more than 1/2 cup ice water (about 3/4 cup). Dough is very sticky. Tried to separate pieces with plastic wrap, ended up laying them separately on a sheet of parchment, keeping them in the fridge 'til ready to roll out. Still needed flour even tho I wrapped the board in plastic. Also, only sprinkled 1 tsp sugar on top of the apples (with the cinnamon) - 2 tsp seemed like overkill. Put in the oven four on each tray, rotated and switched positions at 20 mins.) Mine took 35 minutes to be perfectly golden, however it's a very hot electric oven. Super delicious, I will never eat bought ones again. Def worth the effort.

  • lynnebair | 09/29/2012

    Great result the very first time! I took the hint of the previous reviewer who suggested an egg wash and it produced a nice shiny finish. I disagree slightly that no skill required and that the thickness of the dough doesn't matter. I think it does and it can be a little tricky to get it that thin without sticking to the surface. But this is not really hard-just work fast and keep dough chilled. You will get it after rolling out one. This was a wonderful use of the first local apples of the early fall . I also enjoyed the accompanying article about which apples to use- though You can hardly go wrong.

  • lynnebair | 09/29/2012

    Great result the very first time! I took the hint of the previous reviewer who suggested an egg wash and it produced a nice shiny finish. I disagree slightly that no skill required and that the thickness of the dough doesn't matter. I think it does and it can be a little tricky to get it that thin without sticking to the surface. But this is not really hard-just work fast and keep dough chilled. You will get it after rolling out one. This was a wonderful use of the first local apples of the early fall . I also enjoyed the accompanying article about which apples to use- though You can hardly go wrong.

  • lauac | 11/17/2010

    Amazing recipe! I baked them for 45 mins and rotated the pan halfway through. Don't worry if they bubble over a bit, they still taste great. The dough doesn't really need to be rolled out paper thin- I would roll them a little thicker, say 5 in x 8 in ovals. I would also brush them with an egg wash instead of melted butter because it looks like they could use a sheen. I will definitely make these again! So easy to do!

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