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Recipe

Chashu Ramen

Servings: 4

The key to the success of this traditional ramen is the slow-cooked, intensely savory Japanese-style broth. Paired with the full-flavored braised pork belly, marinated eggs, and noodles, it makes a satisfying dish. See the article How to Make Ramen for step-by-step photos.

Ingredients

For the pork and pork broth

  • 1 lb. pork belly, preferably skin on
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 2 large scallions, trimmed and cut into 4 pieces each
  • 1 1-inch piece (about 1/2 oz.) fresh ginger, peeled and cut into 4 slices

For the marinade

  • 2 cups soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup mirin
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 Tbs. white miso (shiro)

For the marinated eggs

  • 4 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 cup reserved pork marinade

For the ramen broth

  • Reserved pork broth
  • 3 cups unsalted chicken stock
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 8 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 1 21/2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut into 5 slices (2 oz.)
  • Reserved pork marinade, to taste
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground white pepper

For serving

  • 20 oz. fresh ramen noodles (or frozen), or 14 oz. dried
  • Reserved pork marinade, to taste
  • Reserved pork fat (optional)
  • 4 medium scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup shinachiku (seasoned Chinese bamboo shoots; optional)
  • 2 sheets roasted nori, cut into eight 11/2×3-inch rectangles (optional)

Preparation

Make the pork and pork broth

  • Tie the pork at 1/2-inch intervals with kitchen twine. Put the pork in a large pot, cover with water, bring to a boil over medium-high heat, and cook for 15 minutes. Remove the pork, drain the water, and wipe the pot clean.
  • Return the pork to the pot. Add the garlic, scallions, ginger, and just enough water to cover, about 6-1/2 cups. Bring the mixture to a boil, reduce the heat to medium low, and cook partially covered, turning the pork halfway through, until the pork is fork-tender, 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Let the pork cool in the broth.
  • Remove the pork and strain the broth through a cheesecloth-lined strainer into a large bowl; discard the vegetables. Cover the broth and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up to 2 days.

Marinate the pork

  • In a large pot, combine the cooked pork, soy sauce, mirin, sugar, honey, miso, and just enough water to cover the pork, about 3-1/2 cups. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer, uncovered, for 1 hour, stirring and turning the pork occasionally. Let the pork cool in the marinade. When the pork is cool, remove it from the marinade, wrap it in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up 2 days. Strain the marinade through a cheesecloth- lined strainer set over a medium bowl; discard the solids. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. (You should have about 2 1/3 cups.)

Marinate the eggs

  • Fill a medium saucepan two-thirds full with water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to maintain a gentle (not rolling) boil. Fill a medium bowl with ice water. Prick the wide end of the eggs’ shells with a pin or egg piercer. Using a slotted spoon, gently lower the eggs into the pan and cook for 6 minutes. Transfer the eggs to the ice water and let cool completely. Peel the eggs and transfer to a zip-top bag, add the 1 cup reserved marinade, seal, and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up to 2 days.

Make the ramen broth

  • Skim and reserve any fat from the pork broth, then pour it into a large pot. Add the chicken stock, vegetable broth, garlic, and ginger. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer, uncovered, for 20 minutes, occasionally skimming off the foam. Strain the broth through a cheeseclothlined strainer into a medium bowl; discard the solids. Add the reserved marinade to taste (1/4 to 1/2 cup), then season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

Serve the ramen

  • Bring the pork and eggs to room temperature.
  • Position a rack in the upper third of the oven and heat the broiler on high. Remove the twine from the pork, and transfer it to a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Broil, flipping once, until lightly charred on both sides, about 5 minutes total. Let the meat cool, then cut into bite-size pieces and set aside.
  • Meanwhile, bring the ramen broth to a boil in a large pot, remove from the heat, and cover to keep warm. Fill a large pot with water and bring to a boil. Add the ramen noodles and cook according to package directions until firm, yet chewy. Drain and set aside. Put 1 to 2 Tbs. of the reserved marinade and 1 tsp. of the reserved pork fat, if desired, in each of 4 deep serving bowls. Ladle 1-1/2 to 2 cups of ramen broth into each bowl.
  • Divide the ramen noodles among the bowls. Top each with the pork pieces (including some of the fat), scallions, and shinachiku, if using. Cut the eggs in half lengthwise and arrange yolk side up in bowls. If desired, arrange 2 nori strips in each bowl, standing them vertically against the edge. Add additional broth, if desired, and serve.

Reviews

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Reviews

  • dmaddox | 01/14/2018

    Started on Friday, following the directions exactly. Sunday lunch, we had incredibly good ramen for lunch. The broth was rich, generously salty, and full of curly noodles. I found a recipe for braised bamboo shoots that turned out to be very similar to what I’ve had at ramen joints in several cities. This is going into the working cookbook along with chicken noodle soup.

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