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Double-Mushroom Ragoût

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Yields 2 to 2-1/2 cups.

  • Make the menu:
    A Modern Christmas
  • by from Fine Cooking
    Issue 96

  • 1 oz. dried porcini mushrooms (about 1 cup)
  • 3 Tbs. unsalted butter
  • 2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 20 oz. cremini (baby bella) mushrooms, sliced 1/4 inch thick
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped shallot
  • 1/3 cup dry Marsala
  • 1 Tbs. coarsely chopped fresh thyme
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream; more for reheating
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 Tbs. chopped fresh parsley

Soak the porcini in 1-1/2 cups very hot water, stirring occasionally, until they're rehydrated, about 20 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer them to a cutting board and chop coarsely. Strain the soaking liquid through a coffee filter into a small bowl and set aside.

In a 10-inch straight-sided saute pan, heat 2 Tbs. of the butter with the olive oil over medium heat. Add the cremini and 1 tsp. salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms have softened and released their liquid, 5 to 8 minutes. Increase the heat to medium high and cook, stirring more frequently, until the mushrooms are shrunken and very well browned, 8 to 10 minutes more.

Reduce the heat to medium, add the shallots and the remaining 1 Tbs. butter and cook, stirring, until the shallots are softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the Marsala, thyme, porcini, and 1/4 cup porcini-soaking liquid (reserve the remaining soaking liquid if making ahead). Cook and stir until most of the liquid evaporates, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the cream and cook until reduced to a saucy consistency, 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the parsley and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Make Ahead Tips

You can make and refrigerate the ragoût up to 2 days ahead. Just before serving, reheat it in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir in 1 or 2 Tbs. of the reserved mushroom-soaking liquid and 1 or 2 Tbs. heavy cream, letting both reduce slightly until the ragoût is just loose and saucy enough to spoon around the tenderloin. Stir in the parsley.

Photo: Scott Phillips

Very easy and delicious. Everyone loved this dish/sauce. Great accompaniment to roasted tenderloin. Will definitely make again.

@Pat1969 and any other lactose-intolerant diners... For a lactose-free substitute for heavy cream, try some kosher non-dairy creamers listed as "parve" if you don't mind added sweetness -- or puree some *silken* tofu in the same amount as the cream. Hope this helps.

I made this recipe for a dinner party. My guests were so impressed. This reecipe is expensive to make, but so worth it!

I made the tenderloin and this ragout for my annual new years eve. dinner party and OMG it was so good! A huge hit with my guests. If you like mushrooms you should make this recipe. However, as someone who eats a limited amount of fat, this is definitely a "special occaision, once in a great while" recipe due to all the butter and cream (of course that's what makes it taste so darn good)!!!

I would LOVE to really submit a rating...it sounds so yummy! However, for those of us who are lactose intolerant, recipes containing heavy cream are definitely OUT. I know, take the pill, but I find that while it enables me to enjoy fermented dairy products i.e. cheeses, sour cream etc. it isn't too helpful with fresh dairy. Would the sour cream work? What do you suggest that the lactose intolerant substitute in recipes calling for heavy cream that would approximate the results using the called for heavy cream? I'm sure that I am not the only lactose intolerant subscriber to Fine Cooking. So, suggestions anyone?

This made the dinner look and taste special. Used less cream but still came out a winner.

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