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Rosemary-Rubbed Rib-Eye with Charred Red Onions

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Serves 2-4

  • To learn more, read:
    The Upside-Down Grill
  • by from Fine Cooking
    Issue 121

Recreate some of the same grilled flavor you love using your broiler. Bringing the steaks to room temperature before broiling will help them cook on the inside without burning on the outside. If serving more than two people, cut the steaks in half or slice them.

  • 2 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. olive oil
  • 4 tsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tsp. dry mustard
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 12-oz. boneless rib-eye steaks, about 1 inch thick, at room temperature
  • 1 large red onion, cut into 1/3-inch-thick slices

In a small bowl, combine 2 Tbs. of the olive oil, the rosemary, dry mustard, garlic powder, 2 tsp. salt, and 1 tsp. pepper to make a paste. Rub onto both sides of the steaks.

Position a rack about 4 inches from the broiler and heat the broiler on high. Heat a broiler-safe cast-iron grill pan or skillet on the stovetop over medium-high heat until searingly hot (at least 5 and up to 15 minutes).

Put the steaks in the hot pan and transfer to the broiler. Broil about 2 minutes per side for medium rare (130°F), or until they reach your desired degree of doneness. Transfer to a cutting board, tent with foil, and let rest.

Brush the tops of the onion slices with the remaining 1 tsp. olive oil and season lightly with salt and pepper. Put in the pan, oiled side up, and broil until lightly charred, about 4 minutes. With tongs, separate the onions into rings, toss, and continue broiling until crisp-tender and deeply charred, about 4 minutes more. Slice the steaks if you like, and serve topped with the onions

nutrition information (per serving):
Calories (kcal): 360; Fat (g): fat g 22; Fat Calories (kcal): 200; Saturated Fat (g): sat fat g 7; Protein (g): protein g 33; Monounsaturated Fat (g): 12; Carbohydrates (g): carbs g 4; Polyunsaturated Fat (g): 1.5; Sodium (mg): sodium mg 630; Cholesterol (mg): cholesterol mg 75; Fiber (g): fiber g 1;

Photo: Scott Phillips

Very tasty. I didn't deviate at all from the instructions for the rosemary-garlic paste and it was perfect. I grilled the steaks instead of broiling....forgot about the onions :(

My wife and I tried this recipe on two fresh cut Rib Eye steaks and fresh Rosemary from the garden...wouldn't change a thing....cooking on cast iron and about an additional 30 seconds per side in the oven made for a couple of the best steaks we have had...ever!

Very nice concept, bu there is a flaw. "Bringing the steaks to room temperature before broiling will help them cook on the inside without burning on the outside." This is a cooking myth. It is dis-proven, through experiment, here http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/the-food-lab-7-old-wives-tales-about-cooking-steak.html I WILL have to say, that cooking the same steak, with only rosemary in the zipper bag, in a beer cooler, sous vide, is a much bettter use of time (as stated at the link). Our rib eyes came out perfectly medium-rare. Link to the beer cooler sous vide method is in the article.

Excellent, great flavor, easy to put together. I was out of dry mustard but substituted wasabi powder in the steak paste and it worked fine. The charred red onions were especially good and went well with the steak.

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