My Recipe Box

Savory Ways with Apples

Pork Tnederloin with Apples recipe

You already love apples in sweet desserts like pies, cakes, tarts, and crisps. But this favorite fall fruit works wonders in savory recipes, too. Make it star in salad, pair it with pork, or add it to a grilled cheese sandwich for a crisp crunch.

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Arugula, Mint & Apple Salad with Walnuts & Buttermilk Dressing

Apples add their crisp crunch to a colorful salad that would make a great start to a dinner party.

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Cheddar, Apple, and Pastrami Grilled Cheese

This sandwich (aka the Johnny Apple Cheese) features crisp, thinly sliced apples as well as a tangy-sweet apple spread (based on store-bought apple butter) that perfectly complements the pastrami and cheese.

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Smoked Trout with Apple and Crème Fraîche

In this savory-sweet nibble, thinly sliced apple is a fresh, creative stand-in for crostini or crackers.

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Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Apples and Maple-Sage Butter

Apples paired with sweet potatoes and maple syrup make a deliciously sweet side that works with anything from pan-seared steak to roasted turkey.

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Chicken Burgers with Red Cabbage & Apple Slaw

For a fresh take on a burger, give these chicken patties a try. Apples and celery mixed into the ground chicken give the burgers a subtly sweet, aromatic note, while the bright, creamy slaw provides great crunch.

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Sear-Roasted Salmon with Honey-Glazed Fennel

The richness of sear-roasted salmon is contrasted by the bright, sweet-tart salad of apple and fennel that tops it.

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Potato & Cheddar Latkes with Brown Sugar Applesauce

Molten Cheddar oozes out of the centers of these crisp-on-the-outside, tender-on-the-inside latkes, making them more substantial. The simple homemade applesauce makes a heavenly topper.

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Cabbage and Apples with Riesling and Caraway

Apples and cabbage are a classic pairing; the sweetness of the former balances the pungency of the latter. This dish is a perfect match for roast pork loin or sausage, such as bratwurst or boudin blanc.

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Endive and Apple Salad with Warm Goat Cheese

When cooked, Belgian endive develops a mellow, slightly nutty flavor that pairs nicely with sautéed apples, rounds of hazelnut-coated goat cheese, and a sweet-tart dressing for a salad that’s sure to become favorite.

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Curried Parsnip & Apple Soup

Apples that soften when cooked (like Empires, Jonathans, and McIntoshes) make a velvety puréed soup. Curry powder and fresh ginger give the soup a flavor boost, while the chive and apple garnish adds a fresh layer of brightness, calling out the apple flavor.

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Oven-Toasted Ham, Brie and Apple Sandwiches

Creamy brie and crunchy tart-sweet apples complement the salty ham in this hearty sandwich.

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Rosemary-Garlic Chicken with Apple & Fig Compote

Though apples are not cooked with the chicken, they lend their flavor to a savory compote that gets served with it (and which would also be delicious with a pork roast).

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Quinoa Salad with Apples, Walnuts, Dried Cranberries, and Gouda

With its dried fruit, walnuts, and apples, this sweet-and-savory dish is reminiscent of a Waldorf salad. It’s a great meat-free lunch or side dish for dinner.

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Apple, Beet & Walnut Salad with Lemon-Miso Vinaigrette

You can use Gala, Crispin, or Granny Smith apples in this beautiful fall salad.

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Pork Tenderloin with Apples

Turn your Sunday dinner table into the corner table at a French bistro with a meal that incorporates juicy pork tenderloin and a few French cuisine staples like fresh butter, cream, shallots, apples, and thyme.

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Spinach Salad with Apple, Dried Apricots & Pappadam Croutons

Apples meet Indian spices in this unique take on spinach salad.

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Chicken with Apples and Cider

That you make this chicken all in one dish only adds to the beauty of this roast, which features the flavors of apple, cream and tarragon

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Apple, Blue Cheese & Hazelnut Salad on Endive Leaves

This perfect little hors d'oeuvres never goes out of style.

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Apple and Escarole Salad with Blue Cheese and Hazelnuts

Here, piquant blue cheese, toasty nuts, and slightly bitter escarole are delicious counterpoints to sweet, juicy apples.

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127703ContentMarcus Samuelsson/moveablefeast/authors/samuelsson-marcus/ Marcus Samuelsson Marcus Samuelsson (Select) us Marcus Samuelsson brought the art of Scandinavian cooking to New York long before the recent Nordic craze. As executive chef at New York’s Aquavit (from 1995 to 2010), the Ethiopian-born Swede (who graduatedMarcus SamuelssonMarcus Samuelsson(Select)usMarcus Samuelsson brought the art of Scandinavian cooking to New York long before the recent Nordic craze. As executive chef at New York’s Aquavit (from 1995 to 2010), the Ethiopian-born Swede (who graduated from the Culinary Institute in Gothenburg, Sweden, and apprenticed in Switzerland, Austria, and France) turned an entire city on to gravlax and herring, giving Swedish cuisine a modern, luxurious turn, and receiving three stars from the New York Times in the process. In 1999, he was James Beard’s “Rising Star Chef,” and in 2003 the “Best Chef,” New York City.The awards just kept on coming, as Samuelsson branched out with Japanese restaurant Riingo. He received consecutive four-star ratings in Forbes’ annual All-Star Eateries feature, was named one of the 40 under 40 by Crain’s, and was hailed one of The Great Chefs of America by the Culinary Institute of America. And in 2009 he planned and executed the Obama administration’s first state dinner for the first family, Prime Minister Singh of India, and 400 of their guests. He has been a UNICEF ambassador since 2000, focusing his advocacy on water and sanitation issues, specifically the Tap Project.Samuelsson took uptown Manhattan by storm with his Red Rooster Harlem, a spirited neighborhood place where the menu has his renowned Swedish meatballs (with lingonberries, of course) alongside fish and grits, and jerk chicken with yucca. Downstairs, sister venue Ginny’s Supper Club brings live jazz, cocktails, and Samuelsson’s food together until the wee hours. And now he’s brought his blend of cooking and culture to Lincoln Center, with American Table Café and Bar at Alice Tully Hall, and his casual burger joints, Marc Burger to Costa Mesa, California, and Chicago. Back in his native Sweden, Samuelsson has launched American Table Brasserie and Bar, in Stockholm, Norda Bar & Grill, in Gothenburg, and Kitchen and Table, in Uppsala. Among his many TV appearances, Samuelsson is a judge on The Taste (now in its third season), was the winner on Bravo’s Top Chef Masters Season 2, as well as the winner of the second season of Chopped All-Stars. He is also the author of cookbooks Aquavit: And the New Scandinavian Cuisine (2003), The Soul of a New Cuisine: A Discovery of the Foods and Flavors of Africa (2006), New American Table (2009)and the 2012 memoir Yes, Chef, which was also nominated for a James Beard Foundation award.NoneNoneCourtesy of Marcus SamuelssonStandardNoneNoneNone1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM1/9/2016 1:05:47 AM1/1/0001 12:00:00 AMKateSheelyMarcus Samuelsson88O10331/9/2016 01:05:47 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/moveablefeast/authors/samuelsson-marcus/10/30/2013 11:09:06 AMChefFree Content127115ContentPete Evans/moveablefeast/authors/evans-pete/ Pete Evans Pete Evans (Select) us Pete Evans is an award-winning Australian chef, restaurateur, cookbook author, and TV host. Born in Melbourne and raised on Australia’s beautiful Gold Coast, Pete is not your average chef—he’s also an avid fisherman, surfer,Pete EvansPeteEvans(Select)usPete Evans is an award-winning Australian chef, restaurateur, cookbook author, and TV host. Born in Melbourne and raised on Australia’s beautiful Gold Coast, Pete is not your average chef—he’s also an avid fisherman, surfer, cookbook author, and television personality.   Pete’s food career began at the tender age of 19 when, with brother Dave, he opened their first restaurant, The Pantry, in Melbourne’s bayside suburb of Brighton in 1993. It quickly became a favorite spot and found devoted fans among city locals, celebrities, and critics alike. Since then, Pete has opened six award-winning restaurants, written seven best-selling cookbooks, including the Australian barbecue bible My Grill. He has hosted television shows in Australia for the past decade, and in 2012, his series My Kitchen Rules pulled an audience of more than 3.5 million, making it one of the most-watched shows of the year in Australia. Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking will be his first television series in the U.S.NoneNonePhoto courtesy of Pete EvansStandardNoneNoneNone1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM11/4/2013 10:50:52 AM1/1/0001 12:00:00 AMKateSheelyPete Evans78A103311/4/2013 10:50:52 AMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/moveablefeast/authors/evans-pete/8/9/2013 11:26:13 AMChefFree Content101664ContentJonathan Waxman/moveablefeast/authors/waxman-jonathan/ Jonathan WaxmanJonathanWaxman(Select)usThe trajectory of chef Jonathan Waxman’s career is similar to the way the New York Times described his West Coast–style restaurant Jams: “a culinary comet.” That was in 1984, and Waxman’s cooking has never failed to set off sparks. Lively and very Italian, Barbuto, Waxman’s West Village restaurant (opened in 2004), with its wood-fired oven, housemade pasta, and silky seafood, is like a profile of the chef himself. Called “the Eric Clapton of chefs” by L.A. restaurant critic Jonathan Gold, Waxman (a two-time Top Chef Masters contestant) brings the riffs of his California days with Alice Waters at Berkeley’s Chez Panisse, and at Michael’s in L.A. There, in the 1970s, after graduating from La Varenne cooking school in Paris, Waxman was one of the pioneers creating a new American way of cooking, with a reverence for the seasonal and for the vast resources right in our own backyard. Along the way, Esquire magazine named him one of the most influential Americans, for all that he’s contributed to the culinary world.Taking his act to the East Coast, with Jams (where Julia Child was a fan), and later with Washington Park (opened in 2002), Waxman always held fast to the new American ideal of impeccable sourcing and inventive thinking, which continues at Barbuto, and at 2014 launches Montecito (in Toronto, a co-venture with film director Ivan Reitman), Adele’s, in Nashville’s Gulch neighborhood, and his upcoming New York place within 1 Hotels Central Park.Waxman has written cookbooks A Great American Cook (2007), and Italian, My Way (2011), and is also a prime player in the nonprofit Citymeals-on-Wheels fundraising events. NoneNoneCourtesy of Jonathan WaxmanStandardNoneNoneNone1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM1/28/2015 4:53:09 PM1/1/0001 12:00:00 AMRobynAitkenJonathan Waxman90A10331/28/2015 04:53:09 PMArchive_Expire/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/WorkArea/images/application/spacer.gif/moveablefeast/authors/waxman-jonathan/8/11/2008 4:27:48 PMChefFree Content102Moveable Feast Widget

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