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10 Braises That Are Even Better The Next Day

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Scott Phillips

Braises are by nature low-and-slow cooking, so when you start one you’re generally looking at a few hours of cooking (albeit mostly hands-off). If you have the time, though, we think it’s worth starting them even earlier–as in, a whole day earlier. Many braises benefit from an overnight rest in their cooking liquid, which allows the flavors to meld and the meat to absorb more flavor from the sauce. Think of it as a gift to your future self.

  • moroccan lamb with seven vegetables
    Recipe

    Moroccan Lamb and Seven-Vegetable Couscous

    This traditional dish is served as the centerpiece of every festive and celebratory meal in North African communities around the world, from weddings to funerals, for the feast of the Muslim Ramadan, or for the main course of the Jewish Shabbat meal. To make ahead, wait to make the couscous until make the lamb stew ahead of time and prepare the couscous while reheating it.

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  • Recipe

    Asian-Style Beef Pot Roast

    Though the classic pot roast formula is a classic for a reason, it’s fun to change it up to make it more boldly flavored. In this version, for instance, beef chuck roast is simmered in rice vinegar and miso broth, crowned with meltingly tender radishes, bok choy, and scallions.

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  • Recipe

    Milk-Braised Pork Shoulder with Fennel and Cannellini

    In Italy, particularly the Emilia-Romagna region where dairy reigns supreme, they’ve been braising pork in milk for centuries. The lactic acid in the milk helps tenderize the meat, giving it a more satiny and luxurious feel, while the milk cooks down to a rich sauce. This recipe marries the classic technique with an American pot roast, combining the meat and vegetables into a one-dish meal.

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    Classic Chicken Cacciatore

    Cacciatore, or alla cacciatora, means hunter's style, since this dish is traditionally made in Italy with wild game like rabbit, boar or pheasant. In the U.S., it's typically made with chicken: a whole chicken, cut into eight pieces and then seared in hot olive oil. Once browned, the chicken slowly cooks in a tomato sauce infused with fresh herbs and red wine. It's a simple combination that yields deep flavor.

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  • Recipe

    Chile-Rubbed Braised Beef

    The Tex-Mex flavors of this fork-tender meat make it perfect for shredding and using in tacos, burritos, and even nachos. It’s also tasty on its own topped with the chunky slow-cooked sauce made right in the pot and served with rice. For best flavor, season the beef at least a day ahead.

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    Spiced Apple-Braised Pork Shoulder

    Apple and pork is a classic combination. Here, the fruit’s sweetness is balanced by the warm spices—ginger, mustard, cayenne, and black pepper—in the spice rub. For best flavor, season the pork at least a day ahead.

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  • Recipe

    Red Wine Braised Short Ribs

    Braising short ribs in red wine gives them deep, dark color and flavor, and fall-off-the-bone tenderness.

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    Wine-Braised Chicken with Shallots and Pancetta

    In this modern take on coq au vin, Riesling subs for the usual red wine.

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  • Recipe

    Braised Lamb Shanks with Garlic & Vermouth (Souris aux Aulx)

    Beyond developing flavor, there's another reason to make these lamb shanks ahead: they throw off quite a bit of fat into the delicious sauce, and the easiest way to skim it is to chill until the fat floats to the top and solidifies.

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  • Recipe

    Osso Buco Recipe

    This classic braised veal from northern Italy is the world’s best make-ahead dish—it tastes amazing on the second day. The classic accompaniment is saffron-scented Risotto alla Milanese. For a slightly simpler take on this classic, try our Slow-Cooker Osso Buco.

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