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Jam for All Seasons

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Jam-making is usually thought of as a late-summer affair, but there’s no reason to restrict it to just that season. Every season–every month!–there is gorgeous in-season fruit that deserves its own jam session. These are our favorites.

  • Recipe

    January: Lemon-Ginger Marmalade

    This golden-hued marmalade is right at home on toast, but it’s also divine stirred into plain yogurt or dolloped on coconut ice cream. Find pectin where canning supplies are sold—try supermarkets or hardware stores—or online at CanningPantry.com.

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  • Recipe

    February: Thick-Cut Orange Marmalade

    Though the main flavor of this marmalade is orange, the addition of some lemons makes it less cloyingly sweet. You’ll notice there’s no added pectin; it comes from the skin and seeds of the fruit.

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  • Recipe

    March: Tequila-Lime Marmalade

    A long simmer gives this marmalade an assertive flavor, making it equally suitable for both sweet and savory cooking. Try using it as a glaze on chicken, brushing it on in the final stages of cooking.

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  • Recipe

    April: Rhubarb Jam with Lime and Ginger

    Cooking time will vary depending on how much juice the rhubarb releases. Keep a close eye on the mixture as it simmers. For more tips on canning the jam, watch our Canning Basics video.

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  • Recipe

    May: Strawberry Jam

    Spread this jam on bread with almond butter for a delicious PB&J. Try adding 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar during the last 3–4 minutes of cooking the fruit. Be careful not to overcook the jam, or it will taste caramelized.

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  • Recipe

    June: Quick Blueberry Jam

    Perfect for spreading on toast, croissants, or biscuits, or for swirling into yogurt or oatmeal, this super-simple jam will keep—without canning—for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

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  • Recipe

    July: Quick Apricot Jam

    This quick, simple recipe comes from Becky Smith of Frog Hollow Farm in California. The jam doesn’t require canning and keeps for weeks in the fridge—if you don’t eat it all up before then. For a sweeter spread, use a bit more sugar. This recipe is easily halved.

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  • Recipe

    August: Peach-Rosemary Jam

    Sweet, bright, and herbaceous, this jam is delicious on toast or as part of a cheese board. Make sure your peaches are the yellow variety—white peaches don’t have the acidity necessary for canning.

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  • Recipe

    September: Summer Tomato Jam

    Sweet but not too sweet, this jam has a texture so luxurious and refined that it’s hard to believe it’s so easy to make. It’s great on burgers in place of ketchup or served alongside grilled lamb or salmon. It also pairs exceptionally well with cheeses and cured meats.

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  • Recipe

    October: Plum-Vanilla Jam

    This recipe will work with any kind of plums, but I like to use late-season Italian prune plums. Their dense, almost-dry interior gives a higher finished yield than more juicy varieties.

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  • Recipe

    November: Maple Apple-Pear Butter

    Cook the apples and pears with their peels, cores, and seeds to get every ounce of flavor from the fruit. Regardless of what pear variety you use, they must be ripe, or your butter may be unpleasantly grainy.

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  • Recipe

    December: Pear-Cardamom Jam

    Pears are the unsung heroes of the jam maker’s kitchen. On their own, they make jars of glowing, gold-hued jam that is crisp and juicy. When combined with added flavor elements, the pear happily shares the show. This batch uses ground cardamom, but this recipe works equally well with vanilla bean paste, fresh ginger, cinnamon, or citrus zest.

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