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Video Recipes

  • Article

    Video: Operation Eggs Benedict

    Watch our intrepid cook's adventures as he embarks on the ultimate mission: Eggs Benedict to surprise his wife with breakfast in bed.

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  • Article

    Video: 30-Minute Valentine’s Day Menu

    We’ve created a menu that’s quick enough for a weeknight, but special enough for date night, so this Valentine’s Day, make a reservation for two at your dining room table, and pick up a bottle of wine and a couple of lobsters on your way home.

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  • Recipe

    Video Recipe: Cauliflower with Brown Butter, Pears, Sage & Hazelnuts

    In our latest Video Recipe, we’re showing you how to make Cauliflower with Brown Butter, Pears, Sage & Hazelnuts, a homey side dish that’s perfect for special occasions or Sunday dinner.

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  • Recipe

    Video Recipe: Pasta with Pumpkin, Sausage, and Cavolo Nero

    Looking for a creative way to recycle your jack o’lantern? Make this hearty fall pasta dish with pumpkin and kale.

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  • Recipe

    Video Recipe: Beet Salad with Oregano, Pecans, and Goat Cheese

    In this textured, flavorful salad, beets are the star. Watch the video recipe to see how easily this gorgeous salad comes together.

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  • Recipe

    Video Recipe: Roasted Red Grapes with Mascarpone and Rum

    Looking for an alternative to pie this Thanksgiving? Try roasting grapes. This elegant but simple dish is an unexpected holiday-worthy dessert your guests will love.

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  • Video

    How to Make Barbecued Chicken

    In this video, test kitchen manager Julissa Roberts demonstrates Jamie Purviance's recipe for classic BBQ chicken, step by step. Read Jamie's tips and secrets below.In the 15 years or so that I’ve been writing cookbooks and teaching classes about grilling and barbecue, I’ve heard one question over and over: “My barbecued chicken always burns on the outside but stays completely raw inside. What am I doing wrong?”Usually, the answer is that the grill is too hot. Many would-be grill masters throw any kind of meat on the fire, then just cook it until it looks done. This is a particularly bad idea for bone-in chicken, because the outside will always burn before the meat near the bone is fully cooked. The key is to set up your grill with direct (hot) and indirect (cool) heat zones. This way, the chicken can slowly cook through over indirect heat, giving the fat a chance to render under the skin and keep the meat tender and juicy. Then, a quick turn over direct heat crisps the skin without burning it.The other secrets to great barbecued chicken are adding hickory or applewood chips to the fire for smoky flavor, and waiting to coat the chicken with sauce until near the end of cooking, so it caramelizes but doesn’t scorch. It may be a few more steps, but that classic barbecue flavor is well worth the effort.   Recipe:Barbecued Chicken LegsNeed to KnowChoose dark meat. The legs are richer and fattier than breasts, and the extra bit of fat goes a long way toward keeping the meat from drying out.Use a spice rub and a sauce. Sprinkle the rub on the chicken (as shown at right) before cooking so it can penetrate and flavor the meat. Brush the sauce on at the end of cooking to give the chicken another layer of flavor and a deliciously glazed exterior.For a charcoal grill, use hardwood lump charcoal. It burns hotter than briquettes, and it lights quickly, so if you have to add more during cooking, you can just scatter unlit pieces on top of the lit ones. Charcoal briquettes, which are made from compressed hardwood byproducts and additives, take longer to light and can give off a chemical or sooty aroma while doing so.Keep the temperature between 300°F and 350°F so that the meat doesn’t cook too quickly and dry out. if your grill doesn’t have a built-in thermometer, drop a heatproof probe thermometer through its top vent.Add wood chips early. Smoke penetrates the chicken best when it’s close to raw. If you add chips throughout cooking, the meat may taste sooty.   Cook's Tip Glaze the chicken with a few thin layers of sauce near the end of cooking. A thick coating would overpower the other flavors, and because of the sauce’s high sugar content, it would burn if added early. I use a silicone brush because it’s heat resistant, easy to clean, and doesn’t shed, as some other brushes do.Tool KitIn addition to the usual cookware and tools, you’ll need the following grill gear: Digital probe thermometer, if not built into the grill Wire grill brush Applewood or hickory chips Tongs that are 12 to 16 inches long Long-handled silicone basting brush Instant-read thermometer For a Charcoal Grill Hardwood lump charcoal Chimney starter or lighter cubes Long-reach butane lighter For a Gas Grill Smoker box, if not built in   Text and recipe by Jamie Purviance

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  • How-To

    How to Make Chocolate Soufflés

    Soufflés have a reputation for being the divas of the dessert world. But any home cook with a good recipe can make a successful soufflé. In this video, Fine Cooking’s Shelley Wiseman demonstrates pastry chef Zoë François’s technique for making sweet soufflés—airy combinations of pastry cream and whipped egg whites baked until puffed and set. They have a luscious texture and while they aren’t the least bit diva-like, they are the ultimate in sophisticated French desserts.

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  • Recipe

    Video Recipe: Salt-Crusted Fish

    This simple method (and impressive dinner party trick) delivers silky, ultra-moist fish with incredible flavor.

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  • Video

    Baked Ham with Tangerine-Marmalade Glaze Video Recipe

    There's a very simple way to make a plain baked ham even better: brush it with a sweet citrusy glaze while it's heating, and then whisk together a quick snappy sauce using the pan juices. In this video I'll show you how, from start to finish. Put a rack in the lower third of the oven and heat the oven to 325°F.  Trim away any skin and external fat on a 7- to 9-lb. half-ham, preferably a bone-in ham. Leave about a 1/4-inch thick layer of external fat. Set the ham fat side up and score the fat 1/4 inch deep with diagonal slices every 2 inches so that it forms a cross-hatched diamond pattern. Set the ham in a sturdy roasting pan or a baking dish. It should fit fairly snugly with only a couple of inches of space on any side. Add 1-1/2 cups of orange juice to the pan, plus enough water to reach a 1/4-inch depth. Bake for 1-3/4 to 2-1/4 hours,  adding water as needed to maintain 1/4 inch of liquid in the pan. While ham is baking, make the glaze: gently warm 1/4 cup of tangerine or orange marmalade in a small saucepan set over medium-low heat. Stir in 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar, 1/4 tsp. ground ginger, and 1/8 tsp. ground cloves to combine. The ham is ready to glaze when an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center of the ham registers 105° to 110°F. (it should take about 15 minutes per pound). Remove the ham from the oven and raise the temperature to 425°F. Add more water to the pan so the liquid is about 1/2 inch deep. Using a large spoon or pastry brush, smear the glaze generously over the top of the ham.  Return the pan to the oven and bake until the glaze on the ham bubbles and begins to darken, about 10 to 15 minutes; the ham should have an internal temperature of 120° to 125°F. Remove the ham from the oven and transfer to a carving board or large platter. Tent the ham loosely with foil and let it rest for 20 to 30 minutes while you make the pan sauce.  Pour the pan juices into a gravy separator or a 4-cup Pyrex measuring cup. Let sit for 10 to 15 minutes to allow any fat to rise and then pour or spoon off the fat and discard (some hams don't exude much fat). Pour the pan juices into a 2-qt. saucepan, whisk in another 1/4 cup of marmalade plus 2 Tablespoons freshly squeezed  lemon juice. Bring the mixture to a boil. Taste the sauce, and if the flavor isn't as intense as you'd like, continue to boil to concentrate the flavors as desired. Mix 1 Tablespoon of cornstarch with 3 tablespoons of water. Stir in about half this  slurry into the sauce, and whisk until it thickens slightly, about 15 seconds. Add more of the slurry for a thicker sauce. Set aside and keep warm while the ham rests. Carve the ham, arrange on a platter, and serve with the sauce alongside.

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  • How-To

    Video Recipe: Seared Scallops

    Seared sea scallops are an easy and impressive dinner that takes almost no time to make. Plus, one pound of scallops will perfectly feed two people, so it's a great meal for Valentine's Day or any special dinner for two.

    Get the recipe: Seared Scallops with Herb-Butter Pan Sauce.

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  • How-To

    Grilled Flank Steak Video Recipe

    Grilled flank steak is the perfect cook once/eat twice meal. Watch the video to learn how to grill a flank steak with a cucumber-yogurt sauce to perfection and get recipes ideas for using your leftover steak in several easy, weeknight dinners: Open-Face Steak Sandwiches with Herbed Goat Cheese and TomatoesGrilled Flank Steak and Arugula Salad with White Beans and ShitakeRed Onions Stuffed with Grilled Steak, Spinanch, and Feta.

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  • How-To

    How to Make a Caesar Salad

    You don't have to go to a restaurant to satisfy your craving for the crisp, tangy, cheesy goodness of Caesar salad. Making one at home is as simple as shopping for the best ingredients and using them to make your own salad, croutons, and dressing. In this video, you'll learn how to make each of these components, and put them all together for a classic Caesar salad.

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  • How-To

    Classic Baked Macaroni & Cheese Video Recipe

    Creamy baked macaroni & cheese, with its rich flavor, velvety texture, and crunchy crumb topping, is a comfort food classic. In this Video Recipe, you'll learn how to make this dish from start to finish.

    Get the recipe:Classic Baked Macaroni & Cheese.

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  • How-To

    Video Recipe: French Onion Soup

    Classic French Onion Soup is a winter classic, rich with caramelized onions, a baguette crouton and a blanket of  browned Gruyère cheese. Learn how to make it start to finish, with this video recipe, including how to slowly caramelize the onions, how to create the French bread croûtes, and how to brown the cheese until it's melting and golden brown.

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  • Video

    Classic French Omelet Video Recipe

    A classic French omelet is folded in three like a letter, pale golden on the outside, with no browning at all and creamy inside. Although it's a simple dish, you do have to practice a few times to get it just right. Melt 1/2 Tbs. of unsalted butter in an 8-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat. In a small bowl, lightly beat 2 large eggs, 1/8 tsp. of kosher salt or sea salt, and a couple of grinds of pepper with a fork. Beat until the whites and yolks are completely mixed and the eggs are frothy.  Pour the eggs into the skillet and let them sit, undisturbed, until the eggs are just beginning to set around the edges, 30 to 60 seconds. Gently scramble the eggs with a silicone spatula while shaking the pan back and forth.  Scramble and shake just until the eggs have set on the bottom but are still undercooked on top, about 45 to 60 seconds.  Turn off the heat and give the pan a few shakes to evenly distribute the eggs. Tap it once firmly on the stove to smooth the.bottom of the omelet . Sprinkle 1/4 cup loosely packed grated Gruyere cheese down the center third of the omelet and run a spatula around the edge. You can use the spatula to smooth the top of the eggs if necessary. Let it sit for about 1 minute. The top of the omelet will still be loose and the bottom should have no color. Fold a third of the omelet over the cheese. Shake the unfolded third of the omelet up the side and slightly out of the pan.  Place the spatula right where you want to make the next fold, then tip the pan onto a plate to complete the fold.  If you like, rub some cold butter on the top of the omelet to give it a little gloss. Serve immediately.

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  • How-To

    Classic Seafood Paella Video Recipe

    When it's done right, paella is a truly spectacular dish. In this video, Melissa Pellegrino shows you how to pull off paella expert Sarah Jay's recipe for Classic Seafood Paella.

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  • How-To

    Bánh Mí with Red-Cooked Pork Video Recipe

    There's no better example of the French influence on Vietnamese food than the Bánh Mí: thin-crusted baguette, braised meats, pickled vegetables, fresh herbs—all in one sandwich. In this video, Asian cooking expert chef Robert Danhi demonstrates one of his favorite bánh mí sandwiches with sweet and savory red-cooked pork.

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  • How-To

    Olive Oil Poached Salmon with Indian Spices Video Recipe

    Poaching a rich fish like salmon in olive oil over low, slow heat gives it an incredibly tender, silky texture and a pure flavor that you won't believe until you try it. In this video, you'll learn step-by-step, how to make olive-oil poached salmon with a bold Indian spice rub.

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  • How-To

    Grilled Naan Filled with Herbs & Cheese Video Recipe

    When the weather warms up, even die-hard bakers don't often think about baking bread. But flatbreads are a delicious exception. A few minutes on the grill and they're hot, toasty, and ready for a crowd. In this video, you'll learn how to grill toasty Naan Filled with Herbs and Cheese, the perfect partner to lightly spiced lamb burgers or tandoori-stlye chicken kebabs.

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  • How-To

    How to Make Corned Beef Hash

    Use your St. Patrick's Day leftovers for this tasty brunch treat

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