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What To Do With That Strange Veggie in Your Box Share

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One of the best parts (or maybe worst parts, depending on your point of view) of joining a box share or CSA program is that it introduces you to unfamiliar vegetables. What to do with them? Here are some of our favorite ideas.

  • Recipe

    Kohlrabi: Kohlrabi-Radish Slaw with Cumin and Cilantro

    It may look like a turnip, but kohlrabi is a type of cabbage related more to broccoli and cauliflower than to any kind of root vegetable. We can’t get enough of kohlrabi’s crisp, juicy texture and unusual flavor, which combines the earthy sweetness of cabbage and the crunchy bite of a turnip. It's a natural for slaws, either on its own or paired with cabbage, carrots and other usual slaw suspects.

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  • Recipe

    Radishes: Honey-Roasted Radishes

    We all know radishes, of course, but a CSA often introduces us to new, beautiful varieties, and...SO.MANY.RADISHES. Just slicing a few into a salad does not come close to using the abundance. You need a recipe like this one, where radishes are the star and a little honey tempers their pepperiness.

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  • Recipe

    Green Garlic: Spaghetti with Green Garlic and Olive Oil

    In this riff on the classic spaghetti aglio e olio (spaghetti with garlic and olive oil), green garlic replaces the traditional pungent cloves and lends a more delicate garlic flavor.

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  • Recipe

    Garlic Scapes: Potato Salad with Snap Peas and Garlic Scapes

    When the wild piles of curly, corkscrewed garlic scapes pop up at the farmers' markets in June, set the ubiquitous garlic bulb aside and try them in this creamy potato salad. The scapes’ gentle garlic notes enhance the subtle sweetness of the potatoes and peas. 

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  • Recipe

    Fava Beans: Favas with Prosciutto, Mint & Garlic

    Fava beans have two protective layers: a pod with a soft, furry lining and a tough skin around each bean. Popping the beans out of the pod is easy. Parboiling the beans will loosen the skin around the bean just enough for you to pinch it off. A pound and a half of fava bean pods will only yield a scant cup of beans, so this recipe is designed to serve two people. If you want to double the recipe, you can use a cup of shelled fresh peas in place of the extra cup of favas if you like, since peas pair well with these flavors, too.

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  • Recipe

    Beet Greens: Farfalle with Golden Beets, Beet Greens, and Prosciutto

    One undeniable factor of belonging to a CSA is having lots of greens on your hands. Even your root vegetables, like beets, usually come with greens attached. Pro tip: most of them are edible too, and in the case of beet greens, delicious. Try this pasta that combines both beets AND their greens.

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  • Recipe

    Chioggia Beets: Salmon with Roasted Beets

    These candy-striped beets can be cooked just as regular red or yellow beets, of course, but that almost feels like a waste because they lose their beautiful stripes and cook up to a uniform (though still pretty) bright red. This recipe brilliantly splits the difference with some roasted beets and crisp raw ones for garnish.

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  • Recipe

    Broccoli Romanesco

    It's name is broccoli but it cooks up much more like cauliflower. So try subbing it in some of your favorite cauliflower recipes, but it's best kept in florets to retain the gorgeous, fractal pattern that it grows in.

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  • Recipe

    Cardoons: Cardoons with Garlic Butter and Parmesan

    They look like celery but the flavor is reminiscent of both celery and artichokes. They pair well with Italian cheeses, truffles, and especially (as in this recipe) garlic.

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  • Recipe

    Pan-Roasted Sunchokes and Artichoke Hearts with Lemon-Herb Butter

    The sunchoke’s intriguing, subtly sweet, nutty flavor is a bit potato and jícama, with a hint of artichoke. Slice them raw for a crunchy addition to salads and crudite platters, or roast them, as here.

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